Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 68,715   Posts: 1,483,039   Online: 778
      
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 25 of 25
  1. #21
    darkosaric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Hamburg, Germany
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,148
    One more thing: if you are using some toy camera like holga or similar that has only one shutter speed - then for sure you will have under/over exposed frames. My formula for this is same for all films: Rodinal 1+100 semistand for one hour.

  2. #22

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Southern USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,531
    Rating Tri-X at an EI of 200 is within the latitude of the film. Develop normally, the negatives will be a bit denser but have good shadow detail. Too many people do not take the latitude of film into consideration and make unnecessary changes to development with its associated changes in contrast. Usual latitude is 3 stops over to 1 stop under exposure.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  3. #23
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    13,985
    Images
    279
    There's something else to be had than 'text book' examples of a perfect negative. By giving a film like Tri-X more exposure, the tonality of the film will not change much if developed normally, but the texture will. Grain will be more prominent with dense negatives, and that looks interesting to some of us.

    Try using Tri-X at 50 or 100 some time, see what happens. Print the negatives. You might find something you like.
    Photograph a static scene, and bracket at 50, 100, and 200. Cut the roll in thirds and develop one third at a time, using different developing times. Always print the negs individually.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  4. #24

    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    North Yorkshire, England
    Posts
    292
    It is many years since I read Ansel Adam's book "The Negative" and I don't have a copy at hand to check, but I seem to remember that AA said something like this...
    1. In a high -contrast situation, i.e. a sunny day, there is a danger that highlights in the negative will become too dense with normal development.
    2. To bring these highlights down in density, so they are easier to print, development time must be reduced.
    3. But this will also bring mid-tone densities down somewhat, and they will print too dark.
    4. To counteract this, give the film more exposure. This will put the mid-tones back up to where you want them.
    5. Some people call this "overexposing" and "under-developing" but it isn't. It is simply giving the appropriate exposure and development to produce a negative that will deliver the best print.
    6. The apropriate amount of extra exposure and reduced development is determined by Zone system tests.

    Apologies to Ansel If I've got this wrong!

    My personal take on this is as follows. When using 35mm TriX on a sunny day I expose at 200. This is because my personal film speed for TriX is 400. (if it was , say, 320 then I would expose at 160. I develop the film in D76 at 1+2 for 14 minutes. This gives me negatives with a nicely controlled contrast range that print with a grade 2, 2.5 or 3 filter in my Leitz Valoy11 enlarger. This simple procedure works like a dream. There is no mid-tone compression. Tonality looks great. And the negatives have enough shadow detail to allow me to get it to appear in the print, should I want it. The negatives are easy to print, and at a size of 9 or 10 inches across are sharp and have very little grain.

    Alan

  5. #25

    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Oklahoma, USA
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    670
    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    Rating Tri-X at an EI of 200 is within the latitude of the film. Develop normally, the negatives will be a bit denser but have good shadow detail. Too many people do not take the latitude of film into consideration and make unnecessary changes to development with its associated changes in contrast. Usual latitude is 3 stops over to 1 stop under exposure.
    This advice is right on. Tri-X was originally rated at 200 when marketed in the fifties. You get better shadow detain without blowing out highlights when developed in D-76 1:1 at the ISO 400 development time. Tweak agitation to get minor adjustments for your enlarger and paper.

    In flat winter light shoot at 400 and develop 10 - 20% longer.
    Last edited by Richard Jepsen; 07-08-2013 at 08:24 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    RJ

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin