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  1. #1

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    Edges/Rebates not clear after development?

    So, after loading a roll of film in 90+ degree heat and high humidity in a changing bag (wont try that again) I managed to put a tiny kink on the sprocket hole areas of the roll and thus it remained undeveloped on that spot.

    BUT, there are other areas on the rebates that show clumps of silver. Is this normal, or are the rebates supposed to be 100% clear with text?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Rick A's Avatar
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    They should be clear with text visible. Try refixing to clear them.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum

  3. #3

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    They're clear, but with dark spots, I'll grab a photo of the negatives later
    Thanks

  4. #4
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    It sounds like the hypo did not clear the film completely.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  5. #5

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    Also, REALLY dense negatives

    Agitation issue?

  6. #6
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    You have flow-marks around your sprocket holes, which would usually indicate too-vigorous agitation. And yes, those are very over-developed photos.

    The kink in 14A and the spots by the 26 and between 25 & Kodak are stress exposures from loading. If you bend or crush film, it becomes activated and will develop out with additional density as you can see here.

  7. #7
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Those "clumps" are surge marks.

    The type or strength of agitation you used caused the developer to surge through the sprocket holes at a fairly high speed. Where that happens, the film over-develops.

    Really dense negatives can also be caused by over-development.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  8. #8

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    Thanks, the kinks were from cutting the leader poorly, and humidity, ugh
    I'm developing a single roll in a two reel Paterson tank (both reels in), how do I prevent the surge marks?

    Kodak's specs say, invert 5-7 in 5 seconds, which seems aggressive and when I finish and place it back on the counter, I can hear the developer rush back down for a second or two. When I invert, am I supposed to let all of the developer drain towards the cap (due to it being half full?), or just go back and forth quickly?

    This is what the "thick" negative came out to be on the scan

  9. #9
    clayne's Avatar
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    As I mentioned on RFF, I don't think the negs are that bad off - definitely usable stuff still. Be firm, but smooth with agitation. 7 cycles per 5 seconds is too much. Stick to 4-5 per 5-7 seconds, max.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  10. #10
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    One inversion per second, where an inversion is 180 degrees of rotation. Let the developer completely slosh down to the far end of the tank gently, and come to rest before inverting again.

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