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  1. #11

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    The best advice I can give to a beginner is to keep things simple, practice, use resources from Ilford and Kodak (see link below and take Simon Galley up on his offer to send you the printing manual), consult a good book, and stay away from forums until you're more experienced. There's a lot of bad information out there.

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum216/...resources.html

  2. #12
    Rick A's Avatar
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    For my two cents worth, I highly recommend you keep any chems you use for film seperate from those used to develope paper. Dust and debris from the paper could(and usually does) contaminate film, leaving artifacts behind that will make you crazy trying to print.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum
    BTW: the big kid in my avatar is my hero, my son, who proudly serves us in the Navy. "SALUTE"

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by BMbikerider View Post
    For my input, until you get a good grasp of how things work and what you can do with them I heartily recommend that you stick to one make of film, one speed of film, and the same for printing paper, developers and fixers. Once you get the idea then it is the time to start looking further afield. don't try to run before you walk. It will only serve to confuse
    Interesting you would say that. I was thinking the same thing.

    Despite the contractions in the market, there are still tons of different films/papers/developers and such out there. At least it seems so to me. I read stuff here and there about the subtle differences between X and Y and wonder what it means.

    It can all be rather overwhelming. So I decided to stick with the initial decisions (really shots in the dark) I've made for now. Last night's developing failure (I bought some new, proper mixing cups, and was trying to add the developer to the tank as fast as possible in order to be as accurate as possible on the time. I poured it in too fast and "vapor locked" the tank. Thinking I had somehow mis-measured the developer with the new cups, I figured I was good and just dumped the excess out. Turns out I was short, so now the top 1/2" of the roll is all bubbly. Bummer. They were some good shots.) taught me that I still have a lot to learn. Made me think of the opening line to Anna Karenina : "Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way". There are apparently a limitless number of ways to screw this up.

  4. #14
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    There are apparently a limitless number of ways to screw this up.
    There are 26 pages in the thread below, is that a hint? And if you do a search for "mistakes", that's not the only thread. The best thing about printing is that you can do another one. Getting the film developing down is really the tough part. You'll get it, don't worry. Realizing what went wrong is the main thing.
    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum37/4...-darkroom.html

  5. #15
    ROL
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    Quote Originally Posted by winger View Post
    Getting the film developing down is really the tough part.
    True, one mostly has only one chance to get film developing right, but I disagree that it is "tough". It is a repeatable and predictable technical skill made rote with the application of the (a) zone system. I've never heard of a fine art negative. Printing, though correctable and repeatable with a properly exposed and developed negative, involves many individualistic technical and aesthetic decisions, not encountered when processing film. I think there is more than enough evidence on any classical printing forum that good prints are rare, even with the availability of a perfect negative.

  6. #16
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    I can't amagine using a fixer on my film that has been slushing around in an open tray.
    Actually, a very good point I hadn't really considered. I don't have problems with spots on negatives using the same fixer for paper and film, but I am fairly meticulous at washing everything up properly so maybe I am just a clean worker!. However, it isn't a great hardship to mix a separate bottle for film, and I think I will do so in future. Still learning!

  7. #17

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    I agree with the above posts, you can go to the library.

    Jeff

  8. #18

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    I find that if I use a dilution on my film developer that gives me a little extra development time it is much easier to get exact times. On 8 minutes of dev. time an extra 30 seconds is negligible. If you are using a concentration that says 3 min. dev. time 30 sec. extra has a big difference. Slow has many advantages. I also use another film tank holding the precise amount I will need so there is no doubt the tank is full.

  9. #19
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    Excellent news: My pack of Ilford MGIV just arrived! Yessssss.......

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael R 1974 View Post
    The best advice I can give to a beginner is to keep things simple, practice, use resources from Ilford and Kodak (see link below and take Simon Galley up on his offer to send you the printing manual), consult a good book, and stay away from forums until you're more experienced. There's a lot of bad information out there.

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum216/...resources.html
    Very good advice.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

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