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  1. #11

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    These old films didn't change as frequently as the newer stuff. I have an old PLI from just after WWII that recommends about 10 minutes in D-76 with agitation every two minutes for Verichrome. In size 118, it is probably Verichrome, if it is from Kodak. I would recommend that you unwrap the film in total darkness and see if the backing paper is in place and taped so that the film will not unwind. (If the tape is gone and the backing paper is loose, cinch things up and secure it with a bit of Scotch tape.) If the backing paper is in place, you can examine the roll in the light and determine what kind of film it really is.

    The film format is 3.25 by 4.25 inches, and you will not find a film reel for it. You will have to develop it using the see-saw method, where you attach a clip to each end of the film and, with one clip in each hand, run it back and forth through a tray or deep tank of each of the solutions. This is sort of continuous agitation, and times will need to be adjusted. A 10 to 15 percent reduction should do - say 8-1/2 to 9 minutes. Verichrome was orthochromatic, and the instructions say you can develop it by inspection with a Wratten No. 2 safelight (dark red). The No. 2 is really quite dark, and ordinary red safelights are not really safe for this film. Even with the right safelight, I would develop for the first half of the time in total darkness.

  2. #12

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    I tried to develop a roll of 118 verichrome using the see-saw method with a no. 2 safe light. It worked, but was unwieldy and messy.
    Nikor made a 118 reel. They come up for sale on eBay very rarely.
    If the film is wrapped in a paper-backed foil, it may be unexposed. Kodak roll film was packed that way prior to the mid 50's.

  3. #13
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    Ok, thanks for that. When I turn on my pc, I'll post some pics of the roll I took with my tablet. They are too big for the forum and need resizing.

  4. #14
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    Is the foil packet opened? If you remove the roll from the foil, does it provide any clues about it having been taken off the supply spool and rolled onto the takup spool, like with a 'exposed' label sealing the roll after exposure?

  5. #15
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    OK, attached are images of how the film came and the box it came in with it.

    I am now probably considering that it is not exposed, as no where does it mention that its exposed on the paper. As per ctsundevil's suggestion, the film was wrapped in a paper backed foil (as you can see). I didn't realise that this is how it may have come:

    Click image for larger version. 

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  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by hoffy View Post
    OK, attached are images of how the film came and the box it came in with it.

    I am now probably considering that it is not exposed, as no where does it mention that its exposed on the paper. As per ctsundevil's suggestion, the film was wrapped in a paper backed foil (as you can see). I didn't realise that this is how it may have come:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    It looks like unopened indeed. If you don't have a camera for it, you could cut off a piece and tape it inside a 4x5" sheet film holder and expose at low ISO. Develop and see if anything is on it, before you use the rest.
    "Have fun and catch that light beam!"
    Bert from Holland
    my blog: http://thetoadmen.blogspot.nl
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    * "So much time and so little to do. Wait a minute. Strike that. Reverse it. Thank you." (the original Willy Wonka: Gene Wilder, 1971)
    * My favorite cameras: Hasselblad SWC, Leica SL, Leica M7, Russian FKD 18x24, Bronica SQ-B and RF645, Rolleiflex T2, Nikon F4s, Agfa Clack and my pinhole cameras

  7. #17
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    I am probably not that interested in exposing the film, as its a nice little piece to have in the cupboard. I am probably more interested if there are images on it - possibly images that were taken around the time that my father was born. I think I got excited, as it was wrapped in aluminium foil. I immediately thought of what I do when I am travelling with exposed 120 film (call me paranoid).

    Cheers

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by hoffy View Post
    I am probably not that interested in exposing the film, as its a nice little piece to have in the cupboard. I am probably more interested if there are images on it - possibly images that were taken around the time that my father was born. I think I got excited, as it was wrapped in aluminium foil. I immediately thought of what I do when I am travelling with exposed 120 film (call me paranoid).
    Cheers
    I think you're right not exposing the film but keeping it as-is, especially if it isn't used indeed.

    BTW: about the FILMCON 4 in you're signature: you didn't read this thread, did you?
    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum172/...-products.html
    Might be a FILMCON 5 upgrade?
    "Have fun and catch that light beam!"
    Bert from Holland
    my blog: http://thetoadmen.blogspot.nl
    my Linkedin pinhole group: http://tinyurl.com/pinholegroup


    * "So much time and so little to do. Wait a minute. Strike that. Reverse it. Thank you." (the original Willy Wonka: Gene Wilder, 1971)
    * My favorite cameras: Hasselblad SWC, Leica SL, Leica M7, Russian FKD 18x24, Bronica SQ-B and RF645, Rolleiflex T2, Nikon F4s, Agfa Clack and my pinhole cameras

  9. #19
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    Hah, I think we are on a 3, boarderline 2....

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