Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 73,648   Posts: 1,623,460   Online: 970
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 21

Thread: Film Pre-soak

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    New Jersey
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    31

    Film Pre-soak

    I did post something similar to this sometime ago but I wanted to ask about presoak times. For a long time I am using distilled water when I use the developer. I use T-Max 400 film in formats from 35 mm to 8x10 processed in a Jobo CPP2. I generally give it one minute Pre-soak. Kodak told me all their developers are designed to work with filtered tap water, which I do have. I was getting some "Motteling" but I have not resolved that problem. Could I possibly use a 1 1/2 to 2 minute presoak and how would it effect the film? The motteling is on all formats and it follows the rotation of the Jobo drum. The emulsion IS ON THE INSIDE as it should be. It can be seen only on contact prints and enlargements and of course it happens in super clear skies without clouds. Some images can not be taken again. Any help is appreciated!

  2. #2
    cliveh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    3,940
    Images
    344
    This has been discussed many times here. But for my part, I have never done this and don't see the need to do it.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  3. #3
    eddie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,568
    Images
    218
    I use a 5 minute pre-soak, when using my Jobo, using distilled water. I believe it was a Jobo recommendation.

    For tanks, I don't use a pre-soak, unless I'm using a large tank (4-120/8-35mm). I do this to avoid streaking caused by the amount of time it takes to pour the developer in to the larger tanks.

  4. #4
    eddie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,568
    Images
    218
    The OP didn't specify which developer he's using.

  5. #5
    PhotoJim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Regina, SK, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,221
    The only times I've found pre-soaking to be desirable:

    EP-2 print processing - I got streaking if I didn't presoak.
    Two-bath developers - I find I get more consistent results if I presoak. (Not entirely sure I should, but that's my habit at least.)

    Jim
    Jim MacKenzie - Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

    A bunch of Nikons; Feds, Zorkis and a Kiev; Pentax 67-II (inherited from my deceased father-in-law); Bronica SQ-A; and a nice Shen Hao 4x5 field camera with 3 decent lenses that needs to be taken outside more. Oh, and as of mid-2012, one of those bodies we don't talk about here.

    Favourite film: do I need to pick only one?

  6. #6
    Vincent Brady's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Co. Kildare - Ireland
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    2,011
    Images
    173
    Ilford advise not to presoak their Delta 400 prior to development and I never do. With any other B&W film I will always presoak.
    Vincent Brady
    "Visual art is a chase after the invisable and B&W photos remind you of this search for what can't be seen,for what's missing"

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Sydney
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,390
    Images
    84
    It'd be useful if you posted a scan of the problem. I had a streaking problem on a few 8x10 sheets that I rolled in a Jobo. Photo Engineer said it might be lack of pre soak, or it might be due to using water as a stop bath rather than acid stop. Since then I've always done a pre soak and used acid stop and had clean film with no marks. This is HP5 in Rodinal.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Daventry, Northamptonshire, England
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    7,333
    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    Kodak and Jobo specifically specify to not pre-soak film when using Kodak XTOL developer.
    I hadn't noticed this statement so ignorance was bliss for me as I pre-soaked TMax 400 for a full 5 mins to rid the film of the dye when using Xtol. The pre-soak rid the film of the dye very successfully and I didn't notice any problems with using a pre-soak as part of the development process.

    The water in the OP's location may hold the key rather than whether a pre-soak or not is used

    pentaxuser

  9. #9
    wildbill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Grand Rapids
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,642
    Images
    140
    I always do 2-3 minutes regardless of film type in my jobo. Ilford says do not for their films but out of spite I do it anyway. Tmy, no mottling. I only use distilled for mixing developers and for the final rinse.
    www.vinnywalsh.com

    Film photography? This term kills me. As if there's another kind!

  10. #10
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    13,377
    Images
    60
    It seems to me that there are very few examples of manufacturers advising not to pre-soak.

    And a few examples of manufacturers indicating that a pre soak is "not required" or "not necessary".

    And a further few examples of manufacturers being silent on the issue.

    Correct me if I am wrong, but only the first means anything like "dont do it!".

    I use a pre-soak unless told not to.

    It keeps my replenished HC-110 a golden hue.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin