Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,283   Posts: 1,535,047   Online: 1085
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 16 of 16
  1. #11
    Richard Sintchak (rich815)'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    San Francisco area
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,907
    Images
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Vivaldi View Post
    I had this identical problem with 120 roll film with a stainless steel tank and reel. I used 2 inversions every 30 seconds. When I switched to using a Jobo for film development, the problem completely resolved. For those who have had success with 120 roll film and stainless steel reels and tank, I am curious to know what inversion methods have worked for you?
    Slower inversions, load so that the reels do not slosh around inside the tank.
    -----------------------

    "Well, my photos are actually much better than they look..."

    Richard S.
    Albany, CA (San Francisco bay area)

    My Flickr River of photographs
    http://flickriver.com/photos/rich815...r-interesting/

    My Photography Website
    http://www.lightshadowandtone.com

  2. #12
    Shawn Dougherty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,133
    Images
    290
    Quote Originally Posted by Vivaldi View Post
    For those who have had success with 120 roll film and stainless steel reels and tank, I am curious to know what inversion methods have worked for you?
    I had problems with even development of 120 roll film with stainless tanks and reels UNTIL I started doing the following.

    I only load the tank to half capacity, both with film and developer. For example: If I am using a two reel tank I only load film in the bottom reel (I keep the 2nd reel on top and empty as a spacer) I use 500ml of developer (or whatever it takes to cover only the bottom reel). I agitate (for the first minute then once a minute there after) by tipping the tank 90degrees left, right, forward, backward and give a few taps at the end to dislodge air bubbles. This way, all of the developer leaves the film and is replaced in a new position. I rotate the tank a quarter turn each time I set it down.

    I have never had uneven development of 120 film since I started doing this.

    Also, it is a good idea to clean your reels very carefully. Residual photo flow can inhibit development... (although I doubt to the degree we see in these examples).

  3. #13
    piu58's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Leipzig, Germany
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    587
    The cure against uneven devlopment is intensive agitation. The reason for the more darkened edges is that the bromide can easier go away from here. Intensive agitation leads to an exchange of developer everywhere.
    ---
    Uwe Pilz

  4. #14
    ic-racer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Midwest USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,179
    That pattern is frequently caused by underdevelopment at the center of the negative from not using enough developer. Try 10 ml per 120 roll and see if it improves.
    People starting with film tend to skimp on developer and exposure; both are inexpensive
    Last edited by ic-racer; 07-25-2013 at 09:38 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    395
    agitation. kodak's 5 sec every 30 gives me skies much more even around the edges than ilford's 10 sec every 60

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    25
    Quote Originally Posted by PhotoJim View Post
    Don't do that. Put the soft plastic cap on the lid after you've poured in the developer, rap the tank on the counter firmly to dislodge air bubbles, and then invert once a second until the first minute of development is done. Then let it rest until another minute is up and give it ten agitations in ten seconds (inversion again). Continue doing this once a minute until a minute remains, then begin to pour out the chemistry when about 10-15 seconds remain.
    Well, I've done some testing this weeked and it looks like PhotoJim you were right! I followed the Kodak method for intense agitation and now my negatives are evenly developed. I followed this guide:
    http://www.kodak.com/global/en/profe...4017/f4017.pdf
    The plastic reel spinner handle is in the rubbish bin just so I'm never tempted to use it again. Also ordered a seal kit for the film back anyway as I hear your should do it regulary and I'm not sure of the history of my film back's maintenance.

    I've only been into film photography for around a year or so now and I've only ever used Rodinal just because it seemed to damn easy and pretty economical when you're learning. For my testing this weekend though I've tried Ilford ID-11 for the first time and I'm much happier with the results from Tri-x 400. It seems to produce a smoother style of grain.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin