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  1. #11
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    There is a rinse in running water after development (instead of a stop when doing film) which should be no longer than 2 minutes and then into the fix.

    There is a wash after development which should be anywhere from 0 to 30 minutes depending on fix and other process or worflow issues. For example, a you use an acid fix with soft film, wash longer. The best test for this is to use a retained hypo and a retained silver test kit to check your film for wash.

    PE

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    And I would strongly suggest that you don't mix up and then re-use Photo-flo. Mixed up Photo-flo with bits of gelatin from film is a perfect environment for growing slimy things.
    I second this. When I started processing film at home I mixed up 650ml of water and the recommended amount of photo flo (actually the Arista branded version). After a few re-uses it was looking all kinds of grimy and from the very start I was always having to clean marks off the film after drying.

    Now, after the wash, I open the tank, take the film off the reel, drop it back into the tank with water covering it, and add just a couple of drops of the photo-flo straight from the bottle. It's unusual that I see problems now after drying and the only thing I have to rinse photo-flo off is the tank itself. I expect to have to order another bottle maybe 2-3 years from now!

    I used to wash in running water for 8-10 minutes after using non-hardening fixers. Right now I'm using a jug of the Kodak hardening fixer and give it 15 minutes wash just to be safe. I aim the stream of water into the filling hole of the tank and set it flowing fast enough to see air bubbles and water coming out of the draining holes around the lid.

    Ask me again in a few years if this was the correct way to do things or not!

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    I don't understand this, water from the tap flows underground lower than 6 feet, so the temp should be 55-60 degrees standard at all times (once you run through what's in the house pipes, but if you want hot water you have to wait till it gets to the fresh hot water also) so saying its. 72 or more doesn't make sense to me...


    ~Stone | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    The soil around the pipes must heat up some as the warmer water flows through it. Or it's not underground long enough to cool off. My water in the Summer is 73-75F, which is why I process at 75F/24C year round. My water district gets most of our water from surface lakes. If we had a well the water would probably be around 55F as you state.

  4. #14
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    Water in the US runs underground at a little below the frost line to prevent freezing in the winter under local conditions. Thus the temperature varies a bit as you move around the country. The pressure is usually 100 PSI reduced to 60 PSI inside the home. The high outdoor pressure is adjusted to be higher than the ground water pressure to prevent water from flowing inward from the ground if there is any leak. It would flow outwards in the case of a leak.

    PE

  5. #15
    Paul Glover's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Glover View Post
    Right now I'm using a jug of the Kodak hardening fixer and give it 15 minutes wash just to be safe.
    And after reading the thread Matt linked to, that's going to be increasing to at least 20 minutes or I'll be picking up some HCA.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    I don't understand this, water from the tap flows underground lower than 6 feet, so the temp should be 55-60 degrees standard at all times (once you run through what's in the house pipes, but if you want hot water you have to wait till it gets to the fresh hot water also) so saying its. 72 or more doesn't make sense to me...


    ~Stone | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    Haven't lived in the south, have you? Mine comes out at about 75F occasionally 76F in summer. No worries for washing modern films. Of course I also process at 75F

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Cole View Post
    Haven't lived in the south, have you? Mine comes out at about 75F occasionally 76F in summer. No worries for washing modern films. Of course I also process at 75F
    Ahh they must not keep it at or below 6 feet like here since the ground doesn't freeze... That's my guess...


    ~Stone | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk

  8. #18

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    omaha --

    i worked for a portrait photographer years ago ... aside from being her shootingassistant,
    i processed and printed all of her sheet film.

    our regime was this ...
    deep tank-develop ( dk50 - replenished )
    water ( no stop )
    kodak rapid fix ( sans hardener since we retouched with lead )

    then running tap water for 10-15 mins
    then a tray, with a drop or 3 of photoflo

    then hang up to dry ( 5x7 sheets )

    i was there in the late 1980s, and she had this routine since the 1930s ...
    ( from time to time i would print 50year old and it was perfect as if i processed it the day before ) ...

    i wouldn't worry about your processing methods.
    use fixer remover/ perma wash ... and wash 2x what they say you might be OK ...

    have fun, sounds like you're cookin' with gas !
    john
    silver magnets, trickle tanks sold
    artwork often times sold for charity
    PM me for details

  9. #19

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    If you are using some kind of HCA such as Kodak Professional Hypo Clearing Agent, it may be sufficient. According to Kodak, with its use, running water wash requirement is only 5 minutes. Sounds like your total wash time may be 10 minutes or so? Without HCA, I *think* the recommended wash time is as long as 30 minutes. I don't know what Ilford recommends....

    My only concern here is, insufficient washing is something you'll only find out about it usually years later and when you do find out, it's too late.....
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  10. #20

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    As none of us (well maybe two guys here) are the next Ansel Adams or HCB, does longevity really matter? All my negatives are destined for the dust bin whence I expire, so if they last the next 20 years, great. If not - it's not like I'll want to print them anyway.

    Defeatism wins!
    In life you only get one great dog, one great car, and one great woman. Pet the dog. Drive the car. Make love to the woman. Don't mix them up.

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