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  1. #11

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    DEKTOL!!!... and shake shake shake... for me... 1:9 works... 1 part dektol 9 parts water... for about the same time you would do with d-76... builds up contrast really really fast... so you might want to shave off a minute or dilute further.

  2. #12
    TheToadMen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick A View Post
    Under expose and over develope to make TX grain blow up.
    and a lot more agitation while you're at it.
    "Have fun and catch that light beam!"
    Bert from Holland
    my blog: http://thetoadmen.blogspot.nl
    my Linkedin pinhole group: http://tinyurl.com/pinholegroup


    * I'm an analogue enthusiast, trying not to fall into the digital abyss.
    * My favorite cameras: Hasselblad SWC, Leica SL, Leica M7, Russian FKD 18x24, Bronica SQ-B and RF645, Rolleiflex T2, Nikon F4s, Agfa Clack and my pinhole cameras

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by sly View Post
    Delta 3200, in 35mm, developed in Rodinal.
    That'll do it!
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  4. #14
    TheToadMen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lxdude View Post
    Delta 3200, in 35mm, developed in Rodinal.

    That'll do it!
    Fuji Neopan 1600 would also have been a good candidate, if it was still available ...
    (I still got some in the cooler).
    "Have fun and catch that light beam!"
    Bert from Holland
    my blog: http://thetoadmen.blogspot.nl
    my Linkedin pinhole group: http://tinyurl.com/pinholegroup


    * I'm an analogue enthusiast, trying not to fall into the digital abyss.
    * My favorite cameras: Hasselblad SWC, Leica SL, Leica M7, Russian FKD 18x24, Bronica SQ-B and RF645, Rolleiflex T2, Nikon F4s, Agfa Clack and my pinhole cameras

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by David Brown View Post
    Tri-X rated at 1000 developed in Acufine. I know it says "ultra fine grain", but don't believe it.
    That's how I achieved it back in the day. Oh yeah, and really contrasty paper, grade 5 or more.

  6. #16

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    Photoshop!



    ....just kidding....
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  7. #17
    lxdude's Avatar
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    A condenser enlarger helps. One with a point light source really helps.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  8. #18
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    I had the distinct pleasure of printing a couple grainy 11x14 enlargements from expired 7/97 APX-100 shot in a half-frame 35mm camera.

    I developed in D-76 1:1 for 19 minutes at 68F and achieved a Contrast Index 0.59 and EI between 64-80 (though I shot it at EI 50).

    Something about one print just made me happy with it in one go. I feel the negative/film/exposure/sharpness all were PERFECT.

    In all, the perfect print - and the grain isn't huge. But just as smooth and satisfying as anyone could want.

    (Of course the photograph itself, just a group shot, is not newsworthy.)

  9. #19

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    Two things; D-76 is a fine grain developer, and it tends to hide the grain; grain is an inherent part of the film, and there is little you can do to increase it. Selecting a developer like Rodinol (or maybe DK-50) will make the grain apparent, but modern films are still very fine grained. The idea of taking the picture with high enlargement in mind and then using a non-fine grain developer seems to work, at least to some extent (you get into fuzziness problems). An old technique was to print with a texture screen sandwiched with the negative. You used to be able to buy a selection of texture screens, including some for enhanced grain effects, pretty cheaply, but I haven't seen them on the market for about 35 years. Perhaps a reader knows how to make one.

  10. #20
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nworth View Post
    Two things; D-76 is a fine grain developer, and it tends to hide the grain; grain is an inherent part of the film, and there is little you can do to increase it. Selecting a developer like Rodinol (or maybe DK-50) will make the grain apparent, but modern films are still very fine grained. The idea of taking the picture with high enlargement in mind and then using a non-fine grain developer seems to work, at least to some extent (you get into fuzziness problems). An old technique was to print with a texture screen sandwiched with the negative. You used to be able to buy a selection of texture screens, including some for enhanced grain effects, pretty cheaply, but I haven't seen them on the market for about 35 years. Perhaps a reader knows how to make one.
    Yes, D76 is a solvent developer, so if sharp grain is to be obtained - dilute the stock solution.

    I also agree that high enlargement factor is the way to go to get big grain. Not even Rodinal gives that much grain; at least I don't see it as drastically more grainy than even Replenished Xtol, making 16x20 prints from 35mm Tri-X.

    If you must use a developer to get really sharp grain - try FX37. It is way sharper than Rodinal, and gives honest gorgeous grain.

    But cropping negatives gives infinitely more grain than any developer will. Shoot film as if it was intended to be cropped at printing time.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk 2
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

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