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  1. #1

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    Development time for Tri-X 320 rated at 100?

    I'm at a loss for development times for Tri-X 320 rated at 100 in D-76...should I develop for less time?

    I'm sort of a novice at this...How do I compensate in development? Do I develop for less time and if so, how much?

    Thanks....

  2. #2
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    The answer depends on a lot of variables; mainly, did you downrate the film with the intention of pulling for lower contrast, or just to increase shadow detail? If the latter, then develop normally -- though downrating by 1 2/3 stops is a lot for that usage, it might be just fine if you were shooting a subject with a lot of deep shadows and don't have a spotmeter or have a similar situation.

    If you were trying to reduce contrast, however, then you need to reduce development; with most developers, on that film, you'd reduce development by close to 50% for the amount of pull you exposed for -- so if you would normally develop for (say) 6 minutes in D-76 stock solution, you'd need to pull to 3 minutes (which is usually a bad idea because it's hard to get good consistency with such short times, so instead you'd dilute your D-76 1:1 and developer for something like six minutes). The result (at approximately N-2 development) will be a very flat negative -- exactly what you want if you were photographing a high contrast scene such as white rock, sand, or snow in harsh sunlight with deep shadows.

    Alternately, you could hit the middle ground, pull development one stop and let the other 2/3 stop of extra exposure go toward filling shadows; in that case, you'd reduce your dev time about 30% (or dilute 1:1 and increase time about 40%) to get an N-1 (approximately) negative with extra shadow detail -- possibly in anticipation of printing at high contrast to emphasize those now detail-filled shadows.
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  3. #3
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    I assume you exposed a whole roll of 35mm as ISo 100????
    That means you overesposed your film in average 1-2/3 stops.
    In that case cutting development time will help you decrease contrast and prevent blown highlights.

    I'd the development time in about half.
    If time gets too short, use D76 1+1 (masive dev char suggests a time close to 8-8.5 minutes)
    Mama took my APX away.....

  4. #4

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    Hi Estrellita,

    According to my data sheet, the advised time for full strength D-76 at 68°F is 9 minutes. If I were you , I would develop for 8 minutes.

    In the future, start out exposing using the recommended film speed. At the same time, learning the things that Donald explained will make all this a lot easier and more fun. Information on things like "N+1 development" can be found in books referring to the zone system. Before doing that, start with the basics. Purchase the "Kodak Black & White Darkroom Dataguide", and download the technical data sheets for the film and chemistry you plan to use. "Perfect Exposure" By Roger Hicks and Frances Schultz does a reasonable job of explaining all those curves you'll find in the data sheets.

    Have fun!

    Neal Wydra

  5. #5

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    Thank you for the information. This was 120 film and will be developed in D-76 1:1. I was shooting indoors with subjects against a white wall...the lighting was rather poor so I bounced a flash off of the ceiling. I know I should probably be technically savvy before trying to pull this off/do my research before shooting.

    I probably should have just rated it at film speed for this kind if situation, no?

    So, if suggested development is 10 minutes, I'm going to develop for 5-7 in 1:1. Sound right?

    Thanks for the help.

  6. #6
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by estrellita
    So, if suggested development is 10 minutes, I'm going to develop for 5-7 in 1:1. Sound right?
    Anything in that range should get you printable negatives -- which, at this point, is all you can really expect.

    If the shoot was important and can't be reshot, the other thing you could do is shoot a test roll under the same (as nearly as possible) lighting conditions and develop that, then adjust and, if necessary, shoot and process another test, before committing the important roll. Meanwhile, keep the important roll separated and clearly marked...
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.



 

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