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Thread: Lethal?

  1. #11

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    Amidol is what did that with Westons. It stains everything.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Carnie View Post
    I saw a youtube video of the Weston Brothers being interviewd, their fingers were black from putting in chemicals.
    They were waving them around almost as a badge of honour, which for the time would be cool, but after years of working in trays I now wear glove and my hands are getting better.

    There was a time about 12 years ago that I was getting rashes on my hands which I attribute to working dev, stop, fix hypo clear without gloves.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by ME Super View Post
    ...
    This is far less nasty unless you live in California, where H2O was nearly banned because one of it's more ominous sounding names is "Dihydrogen monoxide."
    One city in conservative Orange County almost fell for that hoax, but that was about it. A 14 year-old kid did gather petitions for his science project that asked for a ban on Dihydrogen monoxide...his project was titled "How Gullible are People", or something like that.

    Potassium ferricyanide is not very toxic, despite the cyanide, as the cyanide is tied up pretty tight to the iron. But still toxic. And one does not want to mix it with a very strong acid (working strength stop bath is not a very strong acid) as cyanide gas can be generated.

    Rashes on the hands would probably be caused by an allergic reaction to metol in the developers.
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  3. #13
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eclarke View Post
    It's interesting that the US generation who won WWII were exposed to all the materials we are now afraid of and only about half the newest generation make it through high school.
    And of course those WWII vets never suffered from PTSD either.

    (satire alert)
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera View Post
    Although no longer commonly available or widely used in photo processing, I'd rank cyanide and uranium at the top, with mercury following close behind. After those, anything that's a strong acid or strong base (blixes for color processes are pretty nasty).
    Mercuric chloride is far nastier than the uranium nitrate typically used for toning/intensification.
    - Ian

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Kubach View Post
    Those photograhic chemicals are nothing compare to the drugs I use during the 60's and the 70's

    Jeff
    If you can remember the 70's then you were just not having enough fun.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  6. #16

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    The book "Overexposure" is not very reliable as it is full of distortions, bad data and sensationalism. It completely ignores the dictum that it is the dose not the poison that is important. For example, it states that phosphoric acid is poisonous. In actuality phosphoric acid is a common acidulate in the food industry. According to the authors of Overexposure my next sip of Coca Cola will be my last! I would certainly discourage anyone from buying this book. MSDS's are readily available on the web and are more accurate.

    If one is limited to commonly used photographic chemicals then my candidate would be pyrogallol. The LDlo (lowest lethal dose) is 26 mg per kilogram of body weight. Of course things are a bit more complicated as one must also consider chronic exposure to poisonous chemicals. Then there are mutagens and carcinogens which can have nasty effects at very small doses.
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 08-07-2013 at 03:16 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Carnie View Post
    I saw a youtube video of the Weston Brothers being interviewd, their fingers were black from putting in chemicals.
    They were waving them around almost as a badge of honour, which for the time would be cool, but after years of working in trays I now wear glove and my hands are getting better.

    There was a time about 12 years ago that I was getting rashes on my hands which I attribute to working dev, stop, fix hypo clear without gloves.
    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn View Post
    Rashes on the hands would probably be caused by an allergic reaction to metol in the developers.
    I started darkroom my senior year in high school. Used my hands for tongs in the Dektol. I had a constant rash until I graduated and we went on vacation for a few weeks (no darkroom) and my rash cleared up.
    David
    Taking pictures is easy. Making photographs is hard.

    http://www.behance.net/silverdarkroom
    http://silverdarkroom.wordpress.com

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    The book "Overexposure" is not very reliable as it is full of distortions, bad data and sensationalism. It completely ignores Pasteur's dictum that it is the dose not the poison that is important. For example, it states that phosphoric acid is poisonous. In actuality phosphoric acid is a common acidulate in the food industry. I guess the next sip of Coca Cola will be my last! I would certainly discourage anyone from buying this book. MSDS's are readily available on the web and are more accurate.

    If one is limited to commonly used photographic chemicals then my candidate would be pyrogallol. The LDlo (lowest lethal dose) is 26 mg per kilogram of body weight. Of course things are a bit more complicated as one must also consider chronic exposure to poisonous chemicals. Then there are mutagens and carcinogens which can have nasty effects at very small doses.
    All very true - but then again, McDonalds is far more likely to have lethal effect long-term than most photo chemistry exposure. I think most photographers have far more respect for the chemicals they use and handle than the average person has for the food they eat.

  9. #19
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    Bleaches in color processes are, contrary to what FlyingCamera wrote, not overly acidic and harmful with the sole exception of the (now more or less defunct) Ilfochrome process. Bleaches for C41, RA4 and E6 all operate between pH 4 and 7, and BLIXes between 6 and 7.
    Trying to be the best of whatever I am, even if what I am is no good.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rudeofus View Post
    Bleaches in color processes are, contrary to what FlyingCamera wrote, not overly acidic and harmful with the sole exception of the (now more or less defunct) Ilfochrome process. Bleaches for C41, RA4 and E6 all operate between pH 4 and 7, and BLIXes between 6 and 7.
    I did not mean that they are overly acidic. They are caustic to some degree, the worst of course being as you mentioned the Ilfochrome blix. But you still don't want to breathe their fumes or get them in your eyes.

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