Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,540   Posts: 1,544,347   Online: 989
      
Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    BetterSense's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    North Carolina
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    2,864

    Brush development...what brush?

    I have heard that brush development of sheet film gives good even-ness of development. I have even had astrophotographers tell me that brush development was the ONLY way to get truly even negatives.


    What brush? How do you do the brushing?
    f/22 and be there.

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Southern USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,836
    Any soft bristled brush with a non-metallic ferrule can be used. Check out an artists supply house.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  3. #3
    Dave Swinnard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Parksville, BC Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    250
    Can't speak to the brush issue directly...but

    Speaking of astronomer/photographer... Back in the '70s, as a student at university, I used "swab" development on 4x5 glass plates (astronomical emulsions from Kodak).

    A reasonable amount of developer in an oversize tray and a cotton puff (cotton ball, cotton batting - from pharmacy) that was gently, methodically, and continuously moved over the plate's surface (side to side, up and down, not TOO much pressure - it was to keep the fluid in motion, not scrub the plate) produced a very even development compared to other techniques (no nitrogen-burst development available, just trays - a small department). If I recall correctly, there was also an open-weave rubber mat under the plate to keep it from sliding about and to raise it off the bottom slightly.

    As part of a project, evenness of development was checked by uniformly flashing plates to a moderate density then scanning with a scanning microdensitometer (a large, office filling beast that output as a trace on paper or punched a paper tape). Only the swab development produced a flat scan (indicating even density) across the plate's width and height. All other methods produced unevenness especially near the edges. (developers were MWP-1 and MWP-2).

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,055
    Lots of types will do, it depends on the effect. soft bristles give you one kind of look, stiff gives you another. Some folks use the foam brushes. You will probably not want a wire brush or anything so stiff that it scratches the emulsion...but then again.

  5. #5
    bobwysiwyg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Ann Arbor, MI U.S.A.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,555
    Images
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    Any soft bristled brush with a non-metallic ferrule can be used. Check out an artists supply house.
    Why the stipulation for a non-metallic ferrule? Just curious.
    WYSIWYG - At least that's my goal.

    Portfolio-http://apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=25518

  6. #6
    Hexavalent's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    545
    Blog Entries
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by bobwysiwyg View Post
    Why the stipulation for a non-metallic ferrule? Just curious.
    Most metallic ferrules are a wonderful source of contamination as they will eventually rust/corrode (sometime very quickly). Only a highly-quality stainless-steel ferrule would likely be 'safe'.
    - Ian

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    20
    Simple Hake brush with wood handle works well. I use it and make sure the brush goes in no other chemicals. Just being safe. Learned this method from a fine Pt/Pd printer who shot 8x10 and used brush development. After trying it I have not gone back to regular or interleaving with 8x10 negatives.



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin