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  1. #11
    tony lockerbie's Avatar
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    What Jim says, but I have found that dryness is the most important. Before I load Patterson reels with 120, I always give them a going over with a hair dryer, even if they haven't been wet for some time. Also clip the edges with one of those slightly rounded nail clippers.Do these two things and you will not have a problem.

  2. #12

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    Go to Stainless Steel. I recently switched from plastic to SS. 35mm is more difficult, and I'm getting frustrated, having messed up a couple rolls, but 120 is much easier with SS. Seriously, you will like 120 on stainless.
    “You seek escape from pain. We seek the achievement of happiness. You exist for the sake of avoiding punishment. We exist for the sake of earning rewards. Threats will not make us function; fear is not our incentive. It is not death that we wish to avoid, but life that we wish to live.” - John Galt

  3. #13
    omaha's Avatar
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    In my re-start efforts this year, I bought a Hewes reel and spent an hour or so test loading it in the light with an already developed roll. Once I got the hang of it, it only took a couple of tries in the dark before I could spool it up pretty much effortlessly. I don't have a lot of experience with alternative reel types, but this one is working for me.

  4. #14

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    I had the same problems with plastic reels, the film would sometimes go in in a few seconds, other times film would stick half way, this with both 35mm and 120, I tried SS reels and tanks and found them harder, then with 120 I found two tips, one was to run a pencil round the groves, and tip two was to load the film with the tape end first, the pencil dry greases the reel with graphite, and the tape end is slightly stiffer and makes starting the film easier, I can't remember the last time I had a problem using the above with Patterson reels,
    Richard

  5. #15
    Chris Lange's Avatar
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    Yes, Richard, I should have mentioned that as well. I always fold the end tape over and pull that through the flange with my thumb and forefinger to get it seated. Once this has been done, the rest of the roll should load effortlessly, so long as the reel is dry and clean.
    See my work at my website CHRISTOPHER LANGE PHOTOGRAPHY

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  6. #16
    AgX
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    Be aware that there are not only two basic systems of plastic reels: "true" ratched type with balls (Paterson) and "manual" ratching (Jobo).

    But also clones of both systems. And even from Jobo there are two versions (old and current) that differ in material and design.
    Last edited by AgX; 08-11-2013 at 05:22 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Lange View Post
    Yes, Richard, I should have mentioned that as well. I always fold the end tape over and pull that through the flange with my thumb and forefinger to get it seated. Once this has been done, the rest of the roll should load effortlessly, so long as the reel is dry and clean.
    Next time you load a film try the pencil trick, always works a treat for me, the film just slips in, also, with 120 the ratchet system sometimes doesn't work as well as it should so I always use my thumbs on the edge of the film, one thumb one way the other the second with the ratccet just to help the film to slip in, this has certainly worked for me for a good many years now.
    Richard

  8. #18

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    The reels must be totally dry or the film will stick. Also a little trick I use is to "round off" the corners of 120 film with a small pair of scissors in the changing bag. This makes for a smoother transfer.

  9. #19

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    I think the plastic spirals here are made with loose tolerances so the sides don't stay parallel, causing the 120 film to jam.
    I have also lost a bit of dexterity in left hand.
    I made this jig out of scap (maybe posted before) , and it improved my success rate to nearly 100%.
    The back side is fixed and the 120 spool is held on a shaft so the back edge of the film is aligned.
    Then I just gently rotate the front side.
    I found (in daylight) that cutting a chamfer on the film makes it more prone to jump out in the first half turn - maybe that is specific to the spirals here
    I still occasionally get a crinkle if the film does jam - causes a bright green crescent moon on the image.
    I am thinking to pull a reel apart and see if I can machine more accurate spindle parts of acetal to hold the sides better
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails C41_1_Spiral.jpg  

  10. #20
    cmacd123's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    Be aware that there are not only two basic systems of plastic reels: "true" ratched type with balls (Paterson) and "manual" ratching (Jobo).

    But also clones of both systems. And even from Jobo there are two versions (old and current) that differ in material and design.
    The Paterson Reels seem to have an industry of "cloners" around them. I have one tank made in Hong Kong with its own reels, as well as several of both the Old and New versions of the AP tanks. They all varry in ease of Loading. The AP "compact" series reels do have the Guide flange to help guide 120 film in. They are also of Slightly slicker plastic than the AP "classic" reels. most of the Paterson Made reels are in between the two as far as 'Slickness"

    Jobo reels come in at least three variations, the 1000, 1500 and 2500 series. I have only used the first two. The 1500 reels are very "Slick" and as AgX says they don't have the rachet mechnism, which allows for easing the end of the film back a bit if it gets stuck.

    the Jobo 1000 series are also fairly "slick"

    The Jobo reels have a "Thumb slot" on the side, and tapping on the edge of the film at those slots will let you straighten the film to the center of the spiral. I find that once about three of the sprial slots are full, that the film is then straight enough to to feed quickly by just pushing it into the reel.

    I also find that leaving the Tape on the end of the 120 film, provides extra stiffness for the all critical initial line up of the film. You have to be careful that you don't leave a sticky part of the tape exposed.
    Charles MacDonald
    aa508@ncf.ca
    I still live just beyond the fringe in Stittsville

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