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  1. #1
    arigram's Avatar
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    The Film Developing Cookbook

    I already have the Darkroom Cookbook but I want to learn more about film developing should I consider The Film Developing Cookbook?
    Does it contain all the recent developments in film and chemicals?
    I am at this point because of availabillity of brand chemicals considering to mix my own. Should I bother?
    aristotelis grammatikakis
    www.arigram.gr
    Real photographs, created in camera, 100% organic,
    no digital additives and shit




  2. #2

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    Cookbook

    Arigram-you'd do better to get yourself a copy of the Photo-Lab iindex. Most of the info in the darkroom cookbook was taken directly from that journal. Aside from that the cookbook section here on APUG is probably the most interesting around. I would closely reread the thread on Patrick Gainers Vit-c developers. I recently started usong these and they are just the cats meow. You owe it to youself to do the same. I mean 3 ingredients to make a great developer that will be fresh each time you use it? Just do it!
    Regards Peter

  3. #3

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    I will second the Photo-Lab index.

    Mixing chemicals is not necessarily cheaper. I once figured compared Dektol and D72. They were almost the same. The advantage is you can make non commercially produced developers. Two part developers are one example. Home made D76 will get little pieces of precipitate in it after several weeks. The commercial product will not do this.

    You need a good scale to measure small amounts. This will be $100 or more. Almost anything is ok for sodium sulfite as it is non critical and does not effect activity.

  4. #4
    Ole
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ronald Moravec
    You need a good scale to measure small amounts. This will be $100 or more. Almost anything is ok for sodium sulfite as it is non critical and does not effect activity.
    I haven't seen the Photo-Lab index, so I can't comment on that.

    But I do know that this site is a better source for film developing tricks and developers than the Film Cookbook! Besides, plenty of us already have it, so any question is bound to get ten (conflicting) answers within hours.

    I found a cheap electronic scale on ebay when I started out. Just had a look around (in German, but something like this is better than mine - and cheaper) and found http://cgi.ebay.de/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?...868269062&rd=1 .

    There is a bit of difference between $100 and EUR 17.99!
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  5. #5
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    You can find a decent scale for under $100 at www.balances.com.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  6. #6

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    My digital scale was even cheaper. I want to say $11. The cost of a scale shouldn't stop anybody today. I rarely use the scale for B&W and just go with the spoon method.

    I mix most of my stuff. I'm not sure about cost but it sure is convient. Plus the stuff is always fresh. It can even be easier then some commerical chemicals. If you want to make up a print developer that needs to be diluted you don't mix up a stock first you just make it up diluted. That makes it easier to get all the chemicals into solution. The same thing with film developer. When my film developer goes into the tank it's never more then 30 minutes old.

    The film developing book is okay but if you have the cookbook I don't see much point unless you want a complete set of books.

  7. #7
    gainer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ronald Moravec
    I will second the Photo-Lab index.

    Mixing chemicals is not necessarily cheaper. I once figured compared Dektol and D72. They were almost the same. The advantage is you can make non commercially produced developers. Two part developers are one example. Home made D76 will get little pieces of precipitate in it after several weeks. The commercial product will not do this.

    You need a good scale to measure small amounts. This will be $100 or more. Almost anything is ok for sodium sulfite as it is non critical and does not effect activity.
    I don't know if you noticed, but the most expensive part of D-76 and many other developers is the sodium sulfite. It should be cheap as dirt, but isn't.

    A good scale for weighing very small quantities can be had at a sporting goods store where it is sold for weighing gunpowder. The one I have is calibrated in grains, weighs as little as 1/10 grain, and cost me about $30 US.

    The developers our previous poster was raving about have no sulfite. The ingredients to make a water silution for one time use cost about a quarter for a gallon. The stock solution in glycol or TEA costs more, but is still more economical than D-76 or Xtol. It may cost about $20 a liter, but a liter makes 50 liters of working solution.
    Gadget Gainer

  8. #8
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    [B] Who publishes ' The Film Developing Cookbook ' ? ( how many pages, price etc)

  9. #9
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    I have both the darkroom cookbook and the film developers cookbook. The film developers cookbook also explains why certain chemicals do certain things and will help you understand why you would use as certain chemistry for different situations. I highly recommend it - that you read it cover to cover - It is more than a recipe book. In my darkroom, they are both -must-haves-

  10. #10
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    From my library information
    Author: Anchell, Stephen G.
    Title: The film developing cookbook / Stephen G. Anchell, Bill Troop.
    Published: Boston : Focal Press, c1998.
    Other Authors/Titles: Troop, Bill.
    Material: xii, 163 p. ; 26 cm.
    Table of Contents: Display Full Table of Contents
    Notes: Includes bibliographical references (p. 137-138) and index.
    ISBN: 0240802772 (alk. paper)

    Prices vary, but it should be around $25 for used... 35 for new

    Quote Originally Posted by BarrieB
    [B] Who publishes ' The Film Developing Cookbook ' ? ( how many pages, price etc)
    Mama took my APX away.....

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