Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,566   Posts: 1,545,350   Online: 1036
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 25
  1. #1
    gmfotografie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Austria
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    57

    Switching from RC to FB Paper...

    hi my friends,
    i would like to switch from rc to fb paper :-)

    because fb paper is quit expensive; how is you workflow minimizing fb usage before achieving the final print.

    do you print teststrips on rc paper?

    or

    do you buy a smaller fb papers for testing?

    ..
    .
    .

    best michael

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Switzerland
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    382
    Images
    91
    There is no point in doing test strips on RC if you are using fiber and there is also little point in doing test strips on smaller papers. You need to make test strips from the same batch of papers that you have and will make your final prints on.

  3. #3
    jp498's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Owls Head ME
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,467
    Images
    74
    Drydown is slightly more obvious in FB paper compared to the RC papers I've used.

    I use both. RC has some advantages beside price. It's quick to fix/wash/dry. Its thinner than medium/double weight FB. It's flatter. I use it for contact printing my printfile pages of negatives and for some printing. Other printing I think sometimes looks better on FB paper and is worth the extra work and cost.

  4. #4
    Rick A's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    north central Pa
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,941
    Images
    33
    There is no way to avoid running tests on any paper, RC or FB, bite the bullet and do proper testing, there are different methods of running tests, my method is to cut a sheet into two inch wide strips to verify exposure time. I run a full test for every batch of new paper to establish base time then use the strip to dial in optimum time and contrast.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum

  5. #5
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    14,289
    Images
    301

    Switching from RC to FB Paper...

    I normally print on 11x14 or 16x20 paper. When I put the negative in my enlarger, I usually end up using a smaller 8x10 piece (of the exact same type of paper) in the area of most importance to the image, and make a test strip there, which I then base my first work print exposure on.

    After I make my first work print I study it, and figure out how much exposure (or tone) I need to add or subtract in various portions of the image, and make my second print. Usually I am able to get a print that I'm happy with on this second sheet of larger paper, but sometimes it takes a third sheet.

    Even though fiber paper is more expensive, I think it's better to have a few prints that I'm really happy with, than lots of prints that I feel I'm making compromises with. If you take great care and really pay attention to what you're doing, it's easier to keep costs down in the darkroom.

    A few tricks are:

    1. Use the same film and film developer, so that you know what to expect when you print. This takes a LOT of the guess work and darkroom gymnastics out of the process. Some people don't believe me, but after you learn how to make really good negatives, things just seem to fall into place when you print. Of course a little bit of hard work is required, but you get my drift, I hope.
    2. Use fresh paper of the same kind, and a dedicated print developer. Because if you really want to try to maximize the potential of your film, you must also consider the qualities of your paper and paper developer. The whole process actually starts with the paper, because everything else you do, in exposing and processing your film, serves the purpose of being printed on your paper.

    The whole system comes full circle when you start to really grasp and manipulate all of these parameters to suit your pictures. The more different materials you use, the more confusing it will be. Good pictures don't care if you shoot Ilford or Kodak film, and whether you print on ADOX or Foma paper, using Moersch or Photographer's Formulary chemicals. Pick something and run with it, and learn how to be good at working your materials so that they harmonize, and your darkroom waste will significantly drop. Initial cost will be higher, though, during the time you come to grips with everything.
    Last edited by Thomas Bertilsson; 08-15-2013 at 10:55 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Southern USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,842
    The quality of RC papers has reached the point where, unless your prints are intended for sale or gallery display, there is little advantage in using FB papers. Printing on FB papers is more bothersome, time consuming and costly then RC papers. If you doubt the quality of RC papers you should contact manufacturers like Ilford for more information.
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 08-15-2013 at 02:04 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  7. #7
    David Brown's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    near Dallas, TX USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,302
    Images
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Hoth View Post
    do you buy a smaller fb papers for testing?
    No, one cuts or tears the same paper they're using into smaller pieces for testing.

  8. #8
    Roger Cole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Suburbs of Atlanta, GA USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,893
    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    The quality of RC papers has reached the point where, unless your prints are intended for sale or gallery display, there is little advantage in using FB papers. Printing on FB papers is more bothersome, time consuming and costly then RC papers. If you doubt the quality of RC papers you should contact Ilford or Kodak for more information.
    Even though I print final prints on FB I tend to agree with this.

    The biggest reason I use FB, aside from being something of a traditionalist, is that I've never found an RC surface I like as much as FB glossy air dried. The closest is Ilford Pearl or the Adox MCP comparable. It's good, but not AS good to me. If you frame under glass that really doesn't matter.

    There is also a tactile quality to unmounted FB prints that RC lacks. Simply put, RC feels like a thin sheet of plastic, while FB feels like a heavy sheet of paper. That may or may not matter to you.

  9. #9
    Roger Cole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Suburbs of Atlanta, GA USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,893
    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Hoth View Post
    do you buy a smaller fb papers for testing?

    ..
    .
    .

    best michael
    Quote Originally Posted by David Brown View Post
    No, one cuts or tears the same paper they're using into smaller pieces for testing.
    This is the conventional answer, but with modern papers not always necessary. I don't buy smaller paper for specifically this purpose, but I do stock papers I use in 8x10, 11x14 and 16x20, because I print on all those sizes. Ilford papers, for example, are so amazingly consistent that I find I can make test strips and prints on any size of MGWTFB from any batch and use the data to print on paper from a different size and batch with absolute consistency. Not recommended but I've found it works. Modern Ilford paper is just THAT good and consistent.

    I've not actually tried this with the Adox MCC I also use so that may be as consistent too, I just don't know.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Slovenia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    748
    Images
    9
    Quote Originally Posted by David Brown View Post
    No, one cuts or tears the same paper they're using into smaller pieces for testing.
    I also start with a piece of paper, then after I get an idea of the correct exposure I move to a whole sheet and further refine the exposure. It's difficult to get an idea of dodging and burning on a small piece of paper.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin