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  1. #1

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    Quick question bout Fomapan 200

    I've heard that Fomapan 200 gives a look that is close to Super-XX and older 40's and 50's films. Is this correct?

    Right now I shoot about 100 sheets of 4x5 a month, mostly Delta 100 and HP5 and would love to shoot more. I hear good things about Foma 200 and the price is good so it might be a way to get the vintage look I want at a great price.

  2. #2
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    I don't know if it looks like Super XX, but it is a beautiful film in large format sizes, and very economical. It doesn't age as well as Kodak or Ilford film, so don't stock more than you can use before it outdates. The box says it's a 200 speed film, but I think virtually everyone you talk to will tell you it's really a 100 speed film. Get the Arista.EDU Ultra from Freestyle- it IS Foma, but even cheaper than the Foma-branded films.

  3. #3
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    It's just like any other modern film and capable of excellent results. Like Scott mentions I shoot it at 100EI and it also needs about 75% less development time compared to ther films.

    The only films I've ever come across in recent years remotely similar to 40's & 50's films were the Forte emulsions which were derived from the pre-WWII Kodak emulsions made when the factory opened. The Forte plant began life as Kodak Ltd's Hungarian coating plant and was controlled from Harrow, UK, they coated Plus X, Double X and Tri-X.

    Some people mistakenly call the ADOX/EFKE emulsions old school but in fact they were the first of the modern emulsions.

    Ian

  4. #4
    OMU
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    Hi, shot a few sheets 5x7 of Fomapan 200, EI 100. I usually use Xtol. Anyone with suggestion for dev time?
    Thanks :-)

  5. #5
    BradS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shootar401 View Post
    I've heard that Fomapan 200 gives a look that is close to Super-XX and older 40's and 50's films. Is this correct?
    No. That is far from accurate. It is a modern film and, properly handled gives results like most other modern films. I find it very difficult to work with. As others have already said, it is really an 100 speed film and it really needs far less time in the developer than most other films. Foma 200 makes it very easy to produce "chalk and soot" negatives. Personally, I loathe Foma 200 but, to each their own.

  6. #6
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    Quick question bout Fomapan 200

    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post

    Some people mistakenly call the ADOX/EFKE emulsions old school but in fact they were the first of the modern emulsions.

    Ian
    I think Efke themselves or whoever writes their ad copy says stuff like that. "Silver rich" and all that. Not very accurate but they were trying to find their hook.

  7. #7
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BradS View Post
    No. That is far from accurate. It is a modern film and, properly handled gives results like most other modern films. I find it very difficult to work with. As others have already said, it is really an 100 speed film and it really needs far less time in the developer than most other films. Foma 200 makes it very easy to produce "chalk and soot" negatives. Personally, I loathe Foma 200 but, to each their own.
    Brad- it works wonderfully well when using it for alt-process printing in large format. That extra contrast you're bemoaning plays really nice with platinum, albumen, and salt printing.

  8. #8
    BradS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera View Post
    Brad- it works wonderfully well when using it for alt-process printing in large format. That extra contrast you're bemoaning plays really nice with platinum, albumen, and salt printing.

    Yes, to be clear, I've seen beautiful results from this film....just not in my darkroom . I did not mean to disparage the product in anyway...my commentary is more about my own lack of skill than anything else.



 

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