Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,932   Posts: 1,556,996   Online: 1116
      
Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst 12345
Results 41 to 49 of 49
  1. #41
    Bundesphotograph's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Lower Saxony
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    87
    Barry Thornton quote:

    "The film is ’developed’ in Bath A with agitation every half or full minute -it’s not critical. Actually little development takes place. Mostly the film is becoming saturated with the developing solution. However, some development does take place and agitation is important to prevent streaking. The solution is then poured off and saved. Drain the tank well but don’t rinse or use a stop bath. Then pour in Bath B, and after a quick rap of the tank on a hard surface to dislodge any airbells, let the tank stand still with no agitation for three minutes or so when all development has ceased. Note, though, that while no agitation is ideal, and usually works well for unsprocketed roll film (120/220), there can be streamers from 35mm sprocket holes. This seems to vary with different kinds of tanks, different films, and the local water characteristics. Do your own experiments to determine the minimum agitation you can achieve without streaking before committing a crucial film to the process. Perhaps try one minute intervals to start with."

    http://www.awh-imaging.co.uk/barrythornton/2bath.htm


    I'm using Kindermann stainless steel tanks with 120 and 35mm film.
    I don't agitate Bath B,never had any kind of streaking.

    Cheers
    Wolfgang

  2. #42
    Shawn Dougherty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,134
    Images
    290
    Thank you, Wolfgang.

    As I said, I have all of Thornton's material and am not having any problems with streaking. Just running test and looking for others' experiences using agitation and time to alter negative contrast.

    I've had excellent results with this developer thus far, everything I've developed has been well within the range of printable, which is quite impressive to me in the first place. Just trying to get things really dialed in at this point.

  3. #43
    baachitraka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Bremen, Germany.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,451
    May be it sounds silly. Just wondering, how much of Bath A and Bath B is used for one roll of 120 film?

    Quote Originally Posted by David Allen View Post
    Firstly, I do not use metal tanks - so this should be taken into consideration - but have exclusively used Barry Thornton's two-bath developer with 120 Delta 400 film for many many years.

    The processing sequence that works for me (using Paterson plastic tanks) is as follows:

    00:00 pre-soak with constant agitation
    01:45 drain pre-soak out of the tank
    02:00 Pour Bath A in and invert 4 times in the first 30 seconds followed by a sharp tap on the bottom of the tank to dislodge any possible air bubbles. Then one gentle inversion every 30 seconds always followed by a sharp tap on the bottom of the tank to dislodge any possible air bubbles.
    06:45 Pour Bath A out of tank into a jug.
    07:00 Pour Bath B in and invert 4 times in the first 30 seconds followed by a sharp tap on the bottom of the tank to dislodge any possible air bubbles. Then one gentle inversion every 30 seconds always followed by a sharp tap on the bottom of the tank to dislodge any possible air bubbles.
    11:45 Pour Bath B out of tank into a jug.
    12:00 Pour in water stop bath and agitate constantly
    12:45 Pour water stop bath out into the drain.
    13:00 Pour in fix and agitate constantly
    15:00 Remove films from tank and place into a large jug of water and leave until all of the pink dye is removed from the film then return the film to the fix for a further 2 minutes.
    Finally, wash using the Ilford method.

    A note on mixing the chemicals and use
    • I mix up 1 litre of Bath A (my tank is the 1 litre version that can accommodate up to 4 films) and store in a 1 litre dark brown glass bottle. This one litre is sufficient for 24 films (but note the following point about Bath B).
    • I mix up two litres of Bath B at the normal 12g of Sodium Metaborate (which are stored in two 1 litre dark brown glass bottles) and use each bottle of Bath B for 12 films and then discard.
    • I mix up one litre of Bath B at the N+ dilution of 20g of Sodium Metaborate (which is stored in a 1 litre dark brown glass bottles) and use rarely when needed.


    A note on the N-, N and N+ dilutions
    • 99% of all my photographs are developed with the N version of Bath B. I have never had any negative where I felt that it should have been developed using the N- version of Bath B.
    • The N+ version of Bath B is useful but not in the sense of a strict +1 stop expansion (which can be much better achieved by selenium toning the negative). If I photograph something that has dark shadows and bright highlights but also a significant part of the scene is relatively lacking in mid-tone separation then I use the N+ version of Bath B. This has a significant effect on expanding the mid-tones of a scene that was lacking such a mid-tone separation.


    Having just quickly looked through the 100 odd images on my website, there are 6 photographs where I used the N+ Bath B and all of the rest were developed using the normal Bath B.

    Best of luck finding your own best way of using Thornton's two-bath developer - it is a great, reliable and cheap developer.

    Bests,

    David
    www.dsallen.de
    OM-1n: Do I need to own a Leica?
    Rolleicord Va: Humble.
    Holga 120GFN: Amazingly simple yet it produces outstanding negatives to print.

  4. #44
    mrred's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    686
    Images
    4
    I just fill it up. It is not like it get's diluted or thrown out.
    Get it right in the camera, the first time...

  5. #45
    Black Dog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    I've been everywhere ooooohhh yeaahhhh still I'm standing tall.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,654
    Likewise-it's a very cheap and reliable developer IME.
    "He took to writing poetry and visiting the elves: and though many shook their heads and touched their foreheads and said 'Poor old Baggins!' and though few believed any of his tales, he remained very happy till the end of his days, and those were extraordinarily long "- JRR Tolkien, ' The Hobbit '.

  6. #46
    baachitraka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Bremen, Germany.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,451
    I just placed an order for the chemicals. Hope I can spend some time during holidays.
    OM-1n: Do I need to own a Leica?
    Rolleicord Va: Humble.
    Holga 120GFN: Amazingly simple yet it produces outstanding negatives to print.

  7. #47
    David Allen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Berlin
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    437
    The amount of developer you use is simply determined by how much developer is required to cover the film in the tank or tray that you are using.

    For example, I use Paterson plastic developing tanks. These require 300ml to cover one reel of 35mm film, 600ml to cover two reels of 35mm film, 900ml to cover three reels of 35mm film, 500ml to cover one reel of medium format film and 1000ml to cover two reels of medium format film. The reason I have written 'reels' is that, with medium format film, you can load two medium format films into each reel.

    Apart from having enough developer to cover the film, the only other consideration is exhaustion of Bath B (1L will easily be sufficient for 16 films).

    What I always do is process 4 rolls of medium format film loaded in to two reels in a 1L Paterson tank using 1L of Bath A followed by 1L of Bath B.

    Bests,

    David.
    www.dsallen.de

  8. #48
    baachitraka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Bremen, Germany.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,451
    Thank you very much. Hope things will go find with RPX 400.
    OM-1n: Do I need to own a Leica?
    Rolleicord Va: Humble.
    Holga 120GFN: Amazingly simple yet it produces outstanding negatives to print.

  9. #49
    baachitraka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Bremen, Germany.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,451
    I am very happy with RPX 400 + BTTB. Prints beautifully on Adox Vario Classic. I gave 4:45mins + pouring time. Grain is different compare to Rodinal but I like the smoother tones esp., negatives from Rolleicord.

    Prints were made with Grade 2 filter.
    OM-1n: Do I need to own a Leica?
    Rolleicord Va: Humble.
    Holga 120GFN: Amazingly simple yet it produces outstanding negatives to print.

Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst 12345


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin