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  1. #11
    foc
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    ASA and DIN were superseded by ISO in the mid 1980's around the same time as DX codes on film cassettes and negs was introduced. That would put your film nearer to 30 years old.

  2. #12
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    They still make Tri-X that you can buy and use. If you have never exposed or processed B&W before, you can use your old roll of film to practice loading a film processing reel.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    They still make Tri-X that you can buy and use. If you have never exposed or processed B&W before, you can use your old roll of film to practice loading a film processing reel.
    Better yet: get an expired film (any brand) for $1 to practice with and use the Tri-X for shooting.
    "Have fun and catch that light beam!"
    Bert from Holland
    my blog: http://thetoadmen.blogspot.nl
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    * I'm an analogue enthusiast, trying not to fall into the digital abyss.
    * My favorite cameras: Hasselblad SWC, Leica SL, Leica M7, Russian FKD 18x24, Bronica SQ-B and RF645, Rolleiflex T2, Nikon F4s, Agfa Clack and my pinhole cameras

  4. #14

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    To shoot it at 100 ASA is a good idea, as has been stated before.
    I recommend to process it using "Stand development" after that...

  5. #15

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    Someone posted in another thread that the best thing to use for really old film is d-76. I remember Simon from Ilford agreed but don't remember all the details. Maybe someone else can refresh my memory.

    Good luck!

  6. #16

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    If it has a short (current) leader on it it is post 72 long leader pre but forgotten when they changed exactly.

    Id stick it on eBay people will pay for nostalgia more valuable if you have tub and pack.

    edit

    if you wanna try load and shoot one frame rewind cut and soup in ID11 with added KBr and BZT.

    Id not bother normally lots of fog.
    Last edited by Xmas; 11-30-2013 at 03:10 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Xmas View Post
    If it has a short (current) leader on it it is post 72 long leader pre but forgotten when they changed exactly.

    Id stick it on eBay people will pay for nostalgia more valuable if you have tub and pack.

    edit

    if you wanna try load and shoot one frame rewind cut and soup in ID11 with added KBr and BZT.

    Id not bother normally lots of fog.
    I agree....if you're just wanting a film to use to take pictures (as against any particular interest in experimenting with old films), I'd put this one on Ebay as a collectors items, and use the proceeds to buy a fresh film. Old films are becoming very collectable.

  8. #18
    David Lyga's Avatar
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    My prudent suggestion is to do a 'clip test'. That will definitively tell you which direction to go.

    In the dark, cut off about two inches of UNexposed film and place it on the film aperture of your camera (of course, in the dark). Shoot a scene with much variety of tones at EI 100. Process normally. Wash and dry. Now, with a magnifying glass and a white piece of paper behind it, scrutinize the negative carefully to observe both shadow detail and highlight rendition, as well as general contrast. You can make your final analysis for the film doing this.

    About ten years ago I bought two 100 ft rolls of Tri-X that 'expired' in 1958. Its current speed is about EI 32 and fog is surprisingly manageable. It is amazing how good some really old B&W film can be. It's just that too many (most) simply guess and shoot the whole roll and then are disappointed. - David Lyga

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