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  1. #11
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    When I started developing film it was 120 or 620 size. Kodak's directions said to put a film clip at each end of the roll and see-saw it in a tray of developer. This was easy to do as the film of the time was orthochromatic and a safelight could be used. Same method for stop and fixer. This was a common practice at the time since developing tanks were not usually available. The method was the antithesis of stand development as the film was constantly in motion. Old photo books often illustrate the technique.
    Just out of curiosity, how did you wash the films?
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  2. #12

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    Thanks for the answers. I guessed stand because of the amount of time stated.

    Must have taken a while to develop 500 rolls that way.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    Just out of curiosity, how did you wash the films?
    The bath tub worked very well.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  4. #14
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JamesMorris View Post
    Thanks for the answers. I guessed stand because of the amount of time stated.

    Must have taken a while to develop 500 rolls that way.
    Maybe they were more interested in quality than quantity?!
    I have a hard time believing someone of that era would think in the same terms of quantity that a person of today would.

    What I love about older techniques is that often they rely on the very simplest tools available. There's an elegance to that, to not be reliant on anything more than a tray and a completely dark room, along with significant skill to make that work. Of course technological progress can be wonderful too. I love my daylight tanks, or even my rotary processors, but I'm actually a little bit curious about this technique, and some day when I have a perfectly dark darkroom, I will probably try it.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  5. #15
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    The bath tub worked very well.
    I bet it did. My mind is locked too heavily in roll film washers and Ilford rinsing techniques.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  6. #16
    erikg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    Maybe they were more interested in quality than quantity?!
    I have a hard time believing someone of that era would think in the same terms of quantity that a person of today would.

    What I love about older techniques is that often they rely on the very simplest tools available. There's an elegance to that, to not be reliant on anything more than a tray and a completely dark room, along with significant skill to make that work. Of course technological progress can be wonderful too. I love my daylight tanks, or even my rotary processors, but I'm actually a little bit curious about this technique, and some day when I have a perfectly dark darkroom, I will probably try it.
    His era is not so far from our own, in fact Robert Adams is still working. But yes a great example can be found in his work of a dedication to a simple straight forward approach and a willingness to work hard. I hope that notion isn't totally gone today.

  7. #17

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    So, is there any real advantage to Adam's method, or is it just another way to achieve the same goal?

  8. #18

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    Just another more labour intensive (and risky) way to achieve the same goal.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    The bath tub worked very well.
    A washed out plastic bucket worked well too. In my case, it was with 616 panchromatic film, and the Kodak Tri-Chem packs.

    I may have had more patience than some 11 year olds .

    And with respect to the Robert Adams technique referred to initially, it may have been one of the few ways at that time that an individual photographer could achieve what was essentially continuous agitation.

    Nowadays, when the continuous agitation choice is relatively commonplace (JOBO, Sidekick, homemade alternatives) we may be prone to taking it for granted.
    Last edited by MattKing; 08-27-2013 at 02:13 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  10. #20
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    I suspect he was taping two 120 rolls together. Because the image area is so close to the edge of the film, 120 development in reels is frequently problematic and he found a workable solution. After years of experimentation I found the Jobo 1500 reels, rotary development with T-max film and T-max developer give even development right up to the edge of the 120 frame in most cases. Thus saving me from those time-consuming measures.

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