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  1. #1

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    Robert Adams' roll film developing technique

    I was reading an essay by Todd Papgeorge on Robert Adams, and came across this explanation of his film developing technique for "The New West":

    http://www.americansuburbx.com/2011/...m-what-we.html

    It involved the use of shallow custom-made trays and required that Adams make a loop of a single roll of film by taping its ends together and then manipulating it through several trays of photographic chemistry, all in pitch blackness. This procedure, requiring thirty-five to forty minutes start to finish, was more time-consuming (and finical) than that undertaken by beginning photography students developing their first negatives in plastic tanks, and considerably more so than that employed by experienced photographers developing, in larger tanks, up to four rolls of the same type of film, or even eighteen, in another, trickier procedure employing yet another kind of tank and steel racks. But for Adams, this painstaking process was essential, because, more than any other technique he knew, it promised that his negatives would have smooth, unmottled development, allowing the sky areas of his bright prints to appear seamless as they burned away at the high end of the photographic tonal scale toward absolute, paper white


    This sounds like stand development, right? Anyone know for sure, and why he taped the roll in a loop rather than use tanks? I wonder if he was doing development by inspection.

  2. #2
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    No I don't think that is stand development. Basically it sounds like tray development of sheet film, except with a loop of 120 film. It that case agitation is continuous, and gentle. He was/is after smooth even development, stand would not be my choice for that.

  3. #3
    AJH
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    It sounds like nonsense. Very likely he would never been enable to tell two rolls apart which were shot identical and processed differently. It is processing with mystification in mind. Not fogging

    If it is panchromatic film how would he inspect the development process? Using IR?

    BTW it sounds more like continous agitation which is not recommended for BW. Although is only dipped briefly and the developer flows along the film. Highly risky because of the stripes which may form.

    Not the same but Andreas Feininger used to laugh his balls off reading about all this earlier Ansel Adams invented mystique in image forming.

    And then later Ansel Adams thought it quite OK to distribute images digitally reproduced on screen or in print. So much for the need of special handlings.
    Last edited by AJH; 08-27-2013 at 04:50 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  4. #4
    MDR
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    Interesting thank you, I agree with erik that this doesn't sound like stand development maybe semi-stand at best but again I doubt it.

    AJH there are chemicals that allow you to desensitize the film for certain wavelengths thus allows you to use safelights during the development process. Development by inspection is done by many large format photographers and yes they do uses nightvision glasses/goggles.

  5. #5
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    It does bring back to mind an early experience I had developing film, which involved a heavy ceramic roller half-immersed in a bath of developer. You looped the film under the roller, held one end of the film in one hand and the other in the other, then ran the film through the developer by raising and lowering your hands left-and-right. In darkness, of course. I remember doing this a few times, seemed to work OK. I've often thought of using PVC pipe to build a super-sized Minox-like tank that would take 35mm film, emulsion outwards. Something to look forward to in retirement!

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    Quote Originally Posted by AJH View Post
    And then later Ansel Adams thought it quite OK to distribute images digitally reproduced on screen or in print. So much for the need of special handlings.
    Ansel Adams died in 1984. Were these technologies available then?

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    I can recall seeing a video about David Plowden and he also developed 120 film in some kind of tray system. Anyhow he didn't use the normal tank with inversion agitation. It's very hard to get a perfect large area of bright tone. I suppose you really need that ability when working with big open landscapes.

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    Sounds like normal "see-saw" development, with liberal additions of bullsh!t in the article. This was how people would develop rollfilm, back in the old days, before daylight-tanks were common and when most emulsions were not yet panchromatic. When complete darkness was needed for the new panchromatic emulsions, daylight-tanks gradually became more popular among hobbyist users. I still recall the method being detailed on the film-information sheets in the box with Verichrome.

    The "amateur" user, with one roll to develop, would have trays (often the same trays that were used to produce the contact-prints from the film) of dev stop and fix laid out, then the roll would be held with one end in each hand and by lifting and lowering the hands alternately it would be moved through the bath, from one end of the roll to the other, in a see-saw motion. If the film was sufficiently insensitive then it could easily be developed by inspection using this technique, otherwise development would be done on time.

    The "professional", on the other hand, would typically be using a deep tank system with a cage containing the reels and sheet hangers. The cage was lifted out of the tanks and tilted to drain momentarily for agitation. This is how I developed customer films while working in a lab. The cage we used would take twelve 4x5" or six 10x8" sheets, or umpteen reels, and development was always very even using replenished D76.

  9. #9
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    Jobo processors use continuous agitation and they do quite well with b&w. Develop by inspection can be done without goggles, Weston did it, people like Michael A. Smith still do. I don't get the remarks about Ansel Adams, this is about Robert Adams' technique, and his prints speak for themselves.

  10. #10

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    When I started developing film it was 120 or 620 size. Kodak's directions said to put a film clip at each end of the roll and see-saw it in a tray of developer. This was easy to do as the film of the time was orthochromatic and a safelight could be used. Same method for stop and fixer. This was a common practice at the time since developing tanks were not usually available. The method was the antithesis of stand development as the film was constantly in motion. Old photo books often illustrate the technique.
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 08-27-2013 at 08:27 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

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