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  1. #1
    Dr Croubie's Avatar
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    Kodak Commercial 4127 + Xtol = ?

    So I've just gotten quite a few sheets of Kodak Commercial 4127 4x5 relatively cheaply. I understand that it's primarily a copy and scientific film, but i'm all for experimentation with weird stuff.
    I've found the datasheet for it here. They say it can be rated at ei50 in daylight (despite needing exposure compensation for everything besides 1/25), but I can work around that.
    But my main problem is that the datasheet only says D11, DK50, and HC110, it doesn't appear on the Massive Dev Chart, and my other searches are being rather fruitless. Basically, I've only got XTol mixed up, Rodinal, and Microphen (which I'll mix up one day). Has anyone ever developed 4127 in Xtol with any success? Or should I just go for a Rodinal stand? Or just buy some HC110 and be done with it?
    An awful lot of electrons were terribly inconvenienced in the making of this post.

  2. #2
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Shoot a sheet or two at EI 50.

    Develop to see how your shadow details are. If thin - give more exposure and do this over again.

    When shadow detail looks good, focus on getting your highlights under control. I recommend using dilute Xtol since stock would probably develop this film way too fast.
    Shoot a couple of sheets at the EI you determined have good shadow values. If the sheet with good shadow value was thin, develop the new sheet longer. If it was too dense, develop shorter.

    This is the only way you're going to find out for sure how you need to shoot this film.

    Blue sensitive only might give some really strange results, and you can't be sure about how to meter light, since your light meter sees more than blue.

    Have fun!
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh



 

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