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  1. #11
    clayne's Avatar
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    Think outside the box (zone system) here. There is detail in those negatives. You just have to let go of controlling the entire thing. Print it and then go from there.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  2. #12

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    Well. What did I know ! there was little detail in the sky after all. You guys were right, exposure was above a minute to almost two. I didnt have a negative above a minute before. However the grain in the sky (as one of you mentioned) is now prevalent. Very Unattractive for my taste. Nevertheless this mistake has thought me something new. The print has a distinctive very contrasty look I didn't get before. I actually like it as it shows distinct from the reality. What A.A. called a departure from reality.
    I might even do this full strength D76 more often now. No clue how to control the heavy grain of TriX 400 perhaps a different developer ? HC-110 ? Sound like a subject for another post.

  3. #13
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    To control that grain just don't develop so much. Or use a finer grained film. There is no real reason aside from rescuing a mistake to overdevelop THAT much (extreme push processing maybe.)

    It was far from guaranteed that there would be any detail at all however. All films will eventually, given enough exposure, have a shoulder where the curve gets, if not horizontal, at least close enough that detail will be scant and hard to see or print. Modern films are remarkably straight line, t-grain ones even more so, but still vary a lot. Try this same mistake with Pan F+ and I bet you won't print much detail.

  4. #14

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    Reduce it.

    Pre or post exposure fog will give some print density more easily then burning in. You want to find the point where the paper turns a slight grey with no enlarger exposure, then back off 10%. This nudges the emulsion up to threshold.

    There are different kinds of reducers. Sub proportional, proportional, and super proportional and it affects whether it reduced the highlights or shadows more . Unfortunately I can not remember what does what and the proper chemicals to make them.

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