Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 68,678   Posts: 1,482,147   Online: 1028
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 24
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    462
    Images
    6
    Having been a similar situation I ended up using the tray soak method. Put the prints in the tray & let them soak for a half hour. Then dump & change the water a number of times. Per residual hypo testing 7 changes of water over a 4-5 hour time period with 6 prints in an 8x10 tray came out clean.

    I would run at least two changes of water before going to bed at night & then the rest in the morning inbetween breakfast and skiing around town to check on stuff.

    David Vestal in an article I think was titled "mysteries of the Vortex" printed his results of soak rinsing in Photo Techniques a few years ago. It is worth getting for the information.

  2. #12
    arigram's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Crete, Greece
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    5,474
    Images
    69
    Thank you all for the replies guys!
    I really feel bad about wasting water so it is very importand to me.
    I don't do much FB, its mostly 97% RC but even one fiber print wastes enough.
    I'll try that prolonged wash technique, it sounds good.

    Ralph, my house is actually on the center of the city, on the hill that is just two minutes walk from the port. If I could find a good way to use sea water I would, but I wouldn't pick up the dirty one of the port.
    aristotelis grammatikakis
    www.arigram.gr
    Real photographs, created in camera, 100% organic,
    no digital additives and shit




  3. #13

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Phoeinx Arizona
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,343
    20 years ago I lived in a small village in Southern Italy very near the Ocean, the water was not portable and I had water tank which had to filled. I printed FB and when it was time wash I put the prints in mesh bag and using a line tied to a large rock I just tossed the bag into the sea and let the currents wash the prints for 2 or 3 hours, followed by a soak in fresh water. I just looked though my box of reference prints, none have faded yet.

    Regards

    Paul

  4. #14
    gainer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    3,726
    Images
    2
    [QUOTE=rbarker]I'd love to see a photo of Ari carrying buckets of sea water up the hill to his home from the shore.

    Wouldn't work for me either. I'm about 400 miles over and 1200 ft up from the nearest sea water. Glad I have a good well.
    Gadget Gainer

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Milwaukee, Wi
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    3,242

    Using less water

    Since water usage is so critical to you, I would reccommend Hypo Eliminator. It is much more effective than washing aids. It uses equal parts of hydrogen peroxide and household ammonia. Some feel that it will weaken the fibers on fiber based paper. My experience has shown that some papers show frilling of the emulsion but most do not.

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,879
    Images
    11
    Quote Originally Posted by Claire Senft
    Since water usage is so critical to you, I would reccommend Hypo Eliminator. It is much more effective than washing aids. It uses equal parts of hydrogen peroxide and household ammonia. Some feel that it will weaken the fibers on fiber based paper. My experience has shown that some papers show frilling of the emulsion but most do not.
    The following are excerpts from the thread (URL below), posted by Richard Knoppow. These excerpts are consistent with my own darkroom experience.

    http://www.photokb.com/Uwe/Forum.asp...Toner-Archival


    “HE-1 can be made from household ammonia and drugstore
    peroxide, both are about the right strength. The Ammonia
    should be just ammonia, not the kind with detergent in it.
    In order to be fully effective some potassium bromide
    should be added. For those interested the formula is:

    Kodak HE-1 Hypo Eliminator
    Water 500.0 ml
    Hydrogen Peroxide (3%) 125.0 ml
    Ammonia Solution 100.0 ml
    Potassium Bromide 15.0 grams
    Water to make 1.0 liter

    The Ammonia solution called for is Ammonia, 28% diluted 1
    part to 9 parts water, i.e. 2.8%. Household Ammonia is
    generally about 3%.

    If the bromide is not added the eliminator will not remove
    some hypo-silver complexes.”

    Note that Hypo Eliminator is alkaline enough to cause
    disruptions in the gelatin of some materials (pin holes).
    This is generally insignificant for prints but is not for
    film. Hypo Eliminator should NEVER be used for film.
    Further, since the main effect of the eliminator is to
    remove hypo from paper support it is really unnecessary for
    film or RC prints.

    Kodak recommends its use only when one has problems with
    toning.

    Images that are completely free of hypo may be unusually
    vulnerable to oxidative agents in the air. These are very
    common and include auto exhaust, exhaust from gas heaters or
    stoves, paint fumes, and many other sources. While in the
    past it was thought vital for long print life to remove
    absolutely all hypo it turns out that it isn't necessary
    and can be counterproductive.

    The point is that it (i.e. Hypo Eliminator) is not really necessary. For film or fiber paper sufficient washing for archival life can be gotten by using a wash aid (i.e., HCA) followed by a reasonably short wash. Prints are more likely to last if toned especially if they are to be displayed. Negatives generally
    don't need toning.

    RC paper does not need wash aid because it washes out very quickly
    even when fixed in hardening fixer.

    The two-bath fixer IS necessary unless you don't need (fiber based) prints to
    last for more than a few years.

    Richard Knoppow
    Los Angeles, CA, USA
    dickburk@ix.netcom.com
    Tom Hoskinson
    ______________________________

    Everything is analog - even digital :D

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Willamette Valley, Oregon
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,684
    Mysteries of the Vortex by Martin Reed. Dan

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Nedrland
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    48
    Images
    23
    If you don't have any space...I use a Nova print processor. Go and have a look at novadarkroom.co.uk. Also for very good archival printwashers.
    My films i wash with just two liters of water per film. Simply by filling and rinsing five times 1 minute and 5 times 2 minutes. That's what you can do with paper also, only it takes more time than just a minute.

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    462
    Images
    6
    Thanks for the correction on Mysteries of the Vortex. My memory isn't what it oughta be.

    On the Hypo Eliminator. Will there be any shortened print life or greater susceptibility to aerial pollutants if the print is fully toned after using it compared to Hypo Clearing agent and full toning?

    If one uses Kodak selenium toner and then HCA, will there be a difference in reaction to the airborne pollutants? Any studies on it that can be summarized for us laymen to understand?

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    462
    Images
    6
    One more to add on the limited water issue. A few Culligan or similar 15 gallon jugs filled with water & stored will help with the soak method. This will allow you to keep extra water on hand when flow is low or availability isn't the best. If there are any temp fluctuations with the water it will also keep it at room temperature and ready for use.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin