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  1. #1

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    how do I get cream tone B&W pictures.

    How can I get this warm cream tone look in traditional B&W pictures. ? what toner/recipe to use. ?

    here is an example: scroll down a little bit to see the pics. (ignore the colored ones)

    http://marcweisberg.com/2012/03/funk...s-photographer

    I know this tone was created on the computer probably with a few clicks, but I'd lilke to know how to achieve with
    traditional toners.

    thanks.
    Last edited by lhalcong; 09-19-2013 at 04:36 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #2
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    Ilford warm tone paper in dectol

    sepia tone slight, selenium tone slight.

    You will have to play with your strength of the bleach and time, but this look is very obtainable.

  3. #3

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    Any particular brand of Sepia toner ? or any ?

  4. #4
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    I use potassium ferricyanide potassium bromide for the bleach- experiment with the times in the bleach and dilutions

    and I use sodium sulphide for the toner...

  5. #5
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    There are many ready-made, so to speak, brands of selenium and sepia toner. I've used Edwal which works very well (although I really dilute the bleach to slow down the process) and has the added bonus of not smelling to high heaven.
    I've also used the Ilford brand selenium toner although Kodak's is a reliable standard.

    Paper choice is key too - Ilford's Warm Tone is fantastic. Expensive but you get what you pay for, certainly. I've also had good luck with Oriental Warm Tone...look for a paper with a warm or cream base.

    At the risk of flattery, Bob Carnie is a real master so...follow his advice first.
    "Never criticize someone until you've walked a mile in their shoes. That way, you're a mile away and you've got their shoes."

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  6. #6
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    Ilford Warmtone. It's available in RC too and will give you the pinkish highlights. I'm not sure that it takes toning colour as well as the FB version, which you objected to in your other thread. You could also try developing it in high-dilution (1+5) Ethol LPD for warmer blacks too.

  7. #7

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    Do you want a warm image tone on a relatively pure white paper, or on a paper base which is itself slightly cream colored?

  8. #8
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    I find that Foma warmtone papers really gives a nice tone, even without any particular toner-processing done, Ilford's warmtone paper isn't as pronounced imo (in standard lford paper dev).

    I would probably try that route before I started to mess around with real toner chemistry, you can get some really nice and subtle tonings out of the above mentioned papers alone, research how different developers affect the toning properties with those papers.
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  9. #9
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Carnie View Post
    Ilford warm tone paper in dectol

    sepia tone slight, selenium tone slight.

    You will have to play with your strength of the bleach and time, but this look is very obtainable.
    What Bob mentions is very important, to play with bleach dilution and time. It makes a HUGE difference. Start with very high dilution of the bleach, and make it stronger if you don't think you have enough effect. Then try a print with strong bleach, just to see what happens.

    The Ilford Warmtone paper tones pretty rapidly. I use the Moersch MT-3 variable sepia toner, and I set it close to the maximum yellow color. I dilute the bleach 1:100 and bleach a regular print for about 20 seconds. I redevelop in the MT-3, and then I use Harman Ilford selenium toner at about 1:9 dilution and dunk it in there until I see colors and shadow tones that I enjoy.

    When you use the selenium after the sepia toner, the highlights that are toned in sepia will actually intensify.

    It is all about trial and error. If you want to get results like the web site you linked to, you will want to use a large negative for that smooth look, and you may also wish to experiment with a diffusing layer between the enlarger lens and the paper surface. I have found that a few seconds with parchment paper, constantly moving, half way between the paper and lens will lower print contrast somewhat, while smoothing out the grain significantly.

    Have fun!
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  10. #10

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    Foma makes a cream base warmtone that might be what you want. The stuff I use is marked Fomatone Classic Glossy 131.

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