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  1. #41
    DWThomas's Avatar
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    D-76 gives me warm fuzzies because I probably first used it in about 1957, and almost every B&W film made gives specs for developing with it. However, as one whose film efforts are a bit sporadic, HC110 used as a one-shot has become my soup of choice. I can mix it and use it in minutes and it's always fresh.

  2. #42
    Harry Lime's Avatar
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    About 10 or 12 years ago I moved from D76 to DD-X.

    Then about 5 years ago I moved from DD-X to Barry Thornton's 2 bath and Diafine. Two bath developers just work better for me.

    Recently I've contemplated a move to Divided D76, so in a sense I will have come full circle.


    D76 and Tri-X is just one of those brilliant combinations.

  3. #43

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    Another D-23 fan. I started with D-76, moved to other stuff, and went to D-23 several years ago just so I could have a developer that didn't depend on manufacturing changes. It works well with TMax 400, Tri-X 400, and HP5. It works diluted as far down as 1:4 and also as a replenished full-strength developer. Cheap, easy to mix, and repeatable results.

  4. #44
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harry Lime View Post
    About 10 or 12 years ago I moved from D76 to DD-X.

    Then about 5 years ago I moved from DD-X to Barry Thornton's 2 bath and Diafine. Two bath developers just work better for me.

    Recently I've contemplated a move to Divided D76, so in a sense I will have come full circle.


    D76 and Tri-X is just one of those brilliant combinations.
    Harry, Thornton does an 'easy peasy' version of it, where you develop your film in whatever your regular developer is, for 2/3 of the normal time, and then 3 minutes in a water + sodium metaborate solution (2 teaspoons to 1 liter of water). I've got several gallon bags of D76 sitting around, and hear this works brilliantly and is so easy to do.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  5. #45
    Pioneer's Avatar
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    I use a lot of TMX100 and I get great results with D76, so that is what I use. But I use Rodinal for just about everything else.

  6. #46
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    I was always a bit of an iconoclast, so I started off with Edwal FG-7, instead of D-76. Then I progressed to Edwal TG-7, which was supposedly formulated for improved performance with T-grain films like Tmax and Delta (I was shooting Tmax 100 and 400 almost exclusively at the time). I then tried Rodinal because in the long run it's so cheap, and because the Edwal developers became scarce (now extinct). Then I joined APUG, and got turned on to Pyro developers. Lee Carmichael (RIP) turned me on to Pyrocat-HD, and that's been my go-to developer of choice ever since, although if I want increased grain and a certain kind of acutance, I go with Rodinal.

  7. #47

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    After a long (and very very satisfactory) run of DD-X, I recently had to switch to D-76 for reasons of availability. I began to travel more than usual, developing along the way--everyone carries D-76 where I go while I have yet to see a drop of DD-X.

    Is it different? Yes. Is it better or worse than DD-X? Never asked myself--if the picture wasn't worth printing, the choice between the two had nothing to do with it.



    PS. OK, so the above was about moving to D-76. It's quite possible I moved away from it at some point, but going further back than quarter century my memory becomes quite hazy...

  8. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vilk View Post
    PS. OK, so the above was about moving to D-76. It's quite possible I moved away from it at some point, but going further back than quarter century my memory becomes quite hazy...
    No, but that was still a very helpful answer. Surprised (perhaps as a newbie, I shouldn't be) at how many people still seem to use d76. To me that's re-assuring that you can start with something like Tri-X and d76 and, as long as the content and subject matter is there (and I get that that is the real magic), you never need to monkey with any of the other "magic bullets"...
    "Once the amateur's naive approach and humble willingness to learn fades away, the creative spirit of good photography dies with it. Every professional should remain always in his heart an amateur." - Alfred Eisenstadt

  9. #49
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    Confessions of a recovering magic-bullet chaser. That sums up a lot of the arguments over developer choice.

  10. #50
    Harry Lime's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    Harry, Thornton does an 'easy peasy' version of it, where you develop your film in whatever your regular developer is, for 2/3 of the normal time, and then 3 minutes in a water + sodium metaborate solution (2 teaspoons to 1 liter of water). I've got several gallon bags of D76 sitting around, and hear this works brilliantly and is so easy to do.
    Interesting.

    But then I would be dealing with two developers. I'm actually quite happy with my current set up. BT2B is pretty hard to beat for anything up to 400 asa and so is a nicely ripened batch of Diafine (1250asa).

    But there is something about the D76 / Tri-X combo that visually presses all the right buttons. If I went DD76 I could have my cake and eat it. :-)



 

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