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  1. #51

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    I use DK-50, it does the things that I want it to do. And I like.

    Sonny

  2. #52
    Fixcinater's Avatar
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    I started with D76 as that was what my school used and I wanted it to be an easy switch between home and school developing.

    I haven't taken any classes lately, so I switched to HC110 (the easy version outlined by J. Brunner here) to further streamline things. It does fine, and seems less temperature sensitive than D76, which is good as I'm not always as precise as I probably should be. Less concern about shelf life, too, so I'm happy with the switch.

    One less thing to worry about.

  3. #53
    PhotoJim's Avatar
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    I still use D-76 (homemade usually) when I shoot films I'm not really familiar with - and it still does a good job. It's my preferred developer for films that don't seem to work well with PMK, which is my principal developer.
    Jim MacKenzie - Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

    A bunch of Nikons; Feds, Zorkis and a Kiev; Pentax 67-II (inherited from my deceased father-in-law); Bronica SQ-A; and a nice Shen Hao 4x5 field camera with 3 decent lenses that needs to be taken outside more. Oh, and as of mid-2012, one of those bodies we don't talk about here.

    Favourite film: do I need to pick only one?

  4. #54

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    I will jump on the D-76 pile here.

    I started processing film way back when I was a kid and used dektol for film (plus-x and tri-x) and paper both. As I got into my late teens and twenties i graduated to microdol. When Kodak came out with T-Max I started with the T-Max developer. I was never to picky about my results and never processed enough to justify trying too many different things. Then I took a 17 year hiatus until I came back in 2007 and it's been nothing but D-76 since. I use it 1+1 and go by the chart on the package. I have found the stock solution lasts far longer than I expect it to; For example, I'm just finishing up a gallon of stock that I mixed about a year ago. I'm happy with the results and right now I don't have any reason to switch.
    Louis
    (Paladin1420)

  5. #55
    bvy
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    D-76 is and probably always will be my default black and white developer -- as long as Kodak's around to manufacture it. That said, I recently started experimenting with Perceptol, and I'm finding that Pan F and even Neopan 100 both respond beautifully to it.

  6. #56
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Why did you (if you did) move on from D76/ID-11

    What I find nice with D76 is that a lot of people have used it and know it well. All that knowledge is beneficial, especially to someone starting out.
    That ID11 gives exactly the same results just makes the whole thing even better.

    The bottom line is, though, that D76 is good enough to hold its own against most anything out there. Any photographer practicing b&w photography could easily live with D76 and get results so good that they would never need anything else.
    I guess the same could be worded that if D76 doesn't give you results that are good enough, it isn't going to be because of the film developer. A bit facetious, perhaps, but it's true.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  7. #57
    MatthewDunn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    Any photographer practicing b&w photography could easily live with D76 and get results so good that they would never need anything else.
    I guess the same could be worded that if D76 doesn't give you results that are good enough, it isn't going to be because of the film developer. A bit facetious, perhaps, but it's true.
    I'm not sure that's facetious at all. I don't know enough (or care enough) about the individual materials used by the most famous photographers, but I have to assume that there are some people whose work we think of as classic who never moved off of tri-x/d76.
    "Once the amateur's naive approach and humble willingness to learn fades away, the creative spirit of good photography dies with it. Every professional should remain always in his heart an amateur." - Alfred Eisenstadt

  8. #58
    cliveh's Avatar
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    Many years ago I remember watching an interview of Don McCullin filmed at his home. In one shot on a shelf behind him was a bottle labelled D76.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  9. #59

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    I stopped using all powdered chemistry if there is any viable liquid alternative. I now only mix KBr and Benzotriazole from powder.

  10. #60

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    I switched to XTOL from D76 for the following reasons: I only use 3 to 4 liters of developer a year and XTOL lasts forever.... I use a single 5 liter batch for a full year with no problems. I tend to shoot higher ISO's and XTOL pushes better and gives finer grain.



 

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