Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,050   Posts: 1,561,118   Online: 870
      
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 39

Thread: Foma film

  1. #11
    TheToadMen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Netherlands, Europe
    Shooter
    Pinhole
    Posts
    1,493
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    32
    For examples of Fomapan in several developers, see: http://www.filmdev.org/recipe/search?search=Fomapan

    And maybe this thread is interesting too for you:
    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum37/123138-arista-edu-fomapan-100-still-same-thing.html
    Last edited by TheToadMen; 09-26-2013 at 09:05 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    "Have fun and catch that light beam!"
    Bert from Holland
    my blog: http://thetoadmen.blogspot.nl
    my Linkedin pinhole group: http://tinyurl.com/pinholegroup


    * I'm an analogue enthusiast, trying not to fall into the digital abyss.
    * My favorite cameras: Hasselblad SWC, Leica SL, Leica M7, Russian FKD 18x24, Bronica SQ-B and RF645, Rolleiflex T2, Nikon F4s, Agfa Clack and my pinhole cameras

  2. #12
    Pioneer's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Elko, Nevada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,086
    Images
    4
    I use a lot of Arista EDU 400 in medium format and 4x5. I usually use an EI of 200 but I use it at box speed as well and don't mind it. At 6x6 or larger I do not find the grain objectionable at either speed. I don't use it in 35mm though.

    I do use Arista EDU 100 in 35mm because it is really hard to beat the price of a 100 foot roll with anything else. However, I do like it just fine and once my stock of bulk TMX100 runs out I will probably move to the bulk Arista EDU 100. I do find I prefer it if I shoot it at EI50 but it also works just fine at 100.

    I am sure you know, Arista EDU film stock is made by Fomapan and sold by Freestyle so it is the same film.

    One disclaimer I need to make. I have only been enlarging to 8x10 so I really haven't been stressing anything too badly. A lot of the people here are probably enlarging way past that so there comments on grain are probably from looking at much larger prints. I have recently picked up some 11x14 Ilford paper but I haven't used any yet because I didn't have developing trays that were large enough. I may change my mind when I see things enlarged to that size but I kind of doubt it. I suspect my own technique will turn out to be more of an issue then grain.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Racine, QC, Canada
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    26
    Good day John!
    As far as I may be concerned, the Foma line of films (100,200 and 400) is a stable product.
    It carries on a vintage look, and gives you an interesting exposure latitude allowing usage in push- and pull- processing.

    By the infos I have, the Fomapan 200 is a tabular-grain emulsion.


    If you want to save on Shipping, Customs and etc., come visit my website. http://www.argentix.ca

    Great day to all!
    jacques@argentix.ca
    http://www.argentix.ca

    Film can be tested; not time. Stop talking and start shooting...

  4. #14
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    14,415
    Images
    299
    Fomapan are films that are interesting, especially the 35mm versions, because their antihalation coatings are not very efficient. When you shoot direct light you often notice a 'halo' kind of effect in light/dark adjacencies. In photographs with no 'hard edges' of dark/light it looks kind of like severe flare.
    This means that often when there is direct light in the scene, there is halation and that 'halo bloom'. But when there isn't direct light, the film has a tendency to look a little bit flat, so it's a lot more of a balance act than any other film I've ever tried.

    The 120 film has better antihalation coating. Today it is no longer on a blue base, but a clear base. It has very similar tonality to the 35mm film above, but doesn't bloom as much in the dark/bright adjacencies.

    Sheet film wise, I've shot 5x7 400 and 4x5 100 - they are both very much like the 120 in terms of performance.

    All in all it's a fine film. The emulsion, when wet, is a bit softer than the likes of Kodak and Ilford, so tread carefully.

    Hope this helps!
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  5. #15
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Washington DC
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    8,432
    Blog Entries
    51
    Images
    439
    The "vintage" look comes from the fact that the films are not true panchromatic but more ortho-panchromatic (they're not as red sensitive as say Tri-X or FP4+), so they give a look more like old-school emulsions from the 40s and 50s. They may not give as high a contrast when exposed and processed according to box instructions, but folks who do alternative process work love them for printing because they build contrast so easily through manipulated development. I love the Fomapan 200 in 5x7 - at that negative size, grain is non-existent, and they make beautiful platinum prints. I typically rate the 200 at 100 to improve shadow detail.

  6. #16
    TheToadMen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Netherlands, Europe
    Shooter
    Pinhole
    Posts
    1,493
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    32
    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera View Post
    ... They may not give as high a contrast when exposed and processed according to box instructions, but folks who do alternative process work love them for printing because they build contrast so easily through manipulated development. ....

    Could you tell me what you mean with: "they build contrast so easily through manipulated development."
    Until now I used digital negatives for (learning) the alt-processes like Bromoil, salt printing, gum printing, carbon printing and albumen printing.

    I want to start making "real" analogue negatives from now on, so this is interesting. I have an old Russian FKD plate camera (18x24 cm) and several 5x7" film sheet cassettes (but no 5x7" camera yet) for making these negatives.

    (please PM if too much off topic, thank you)
    "Have fun and catch that light beam!"
    Bert from Holland
    my blog: http://thetoadmen.blogspot.nl
    my Linkedin pinhole group: http://tinyurl.com/pinholegroup


    * I'm an analogue enthusiast, trying not to fall into the digital abyss.
    * My favorite cameras: Hasselblad SWC, Leica SL, Leica M7, Russian FKD 18x24, Bronica SQ-B and RF645, Rolleiflex T2, Nikon F4s, Agfa Clack and my pinhole cameras

  7. #17
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    14,415
    Images
    299
    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera View Post
    The "vintage" look comes from the fact that the films are not true panchromatic but more ortho-panchromatic (they're not as red sensitive as say Tri-X or FP4+), so they give a look more like old-school emulsions from the 40s and 50s. They may not give as high a contrast when exposed and processed according to box instructions, but folks who do alternative process work love them for printing because they build contrast so easily through manipulated development. I love the Fomapan 200 in 5x7 - at that negative size, grain is non-existent, and they make beautiful platinum prints. I typically rate the 200 at 100 to improve shadow detail.

    Very good point about spectral sensitivity, Scott. I left that out in my analysis.

    Most Fomapan films I find need less development time for the same contrast index than other films, like HP5 or Tri-X.
    Which one can control, of course. But I imagine that the contrast expansion is very useful to you and other alternative process folks who need much higher contrast than silver gelatin material.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Ohio
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    107
    I have been shooting it for the last 4 years and love it. Foma's QC is not as good as the big 3 so you find an occasional glitch and it's emulsion is more sensitive than the others. I use both the 400 and 100 in 120 with less development than suggested, you have to do your own testing to figure that out. What Thomas and Scott said above are some of the reasons why I like it. You don't know until you try it, in the end it's all a personal preference.

  9. #19
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Washington DC
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    8,432
    Blog Entries
    51
    Images
    439
    Quote Originally Posted by TheToadMen View Post
    Could you tell me what you mean with: "they build contrast so easily through manipulated development."
    Until now I used digital negatives for (learning) the alt-processes like Bromoil, salt printing, gum printing, carbon printing and albumen printing.

    I want to start making "real" analogue negatives from now on, so this is interesting. I have an old Russian FKD plate camera (18x24 cm) and several 5x7" film sheet cassettes (but no 5x7" camera yet) for making these negatives.

    (please PM if too much off topic, thank you)
    If you want to use it for alt process printing, you need a negative with a longer tonal scale, how much depends on the process you're printing. With Platinum/Palladium, you need a modest amount of overdevelopment. With Albumen or Salt, you need more. I expose my platinum/palladium negatives normally, then overdevelop. There are lots of recommendations about the exact way to achieve the proper expanded contrast range - I've been doing it by running my developer at 75F instead of 68F, but keeping my times the same. Other folks will prefer to use a longer time in the developer. The reason I arrived at running the developer "hot" was that in the summertime, the coldest water I can get out of my tap is 75F, and I didn't want to be playing around with alternating adding ice cubes and warm water to a tempering bath to keep my developer consistent at 68.

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Southern USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,010
    May I suggest that you only buy a couple of rolls of each speed at first. It is entirely possible that you may dislike one or all of them. Second tier manufactures like Foma do not have the best reputations for quality control.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin