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  1. #1

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    Heating and measuring water for D76?

    How do you guys heat and measure a gallon of water to mix D76? Can't seem to find gallon grads

  2. #2
    micwag2's Avatar
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    Are you trying to use the entire gallon all at once? If you're developing say one or two rolls, then only warm up what you need to fill your developing tank. I use glass graduated cylinders.

  3. #3
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GarageBoy View Post
    How do you guys heat and measure a gallon of water to mix D76? Can't seem to find gallon grads
    Use a 1 US quart graduated cylinder and a small pail.

    Put 4 US quarts of water in the pail, and then draw a line showing where that volume reaches on the pail.

    If you need a smaller volume measured, you can use the 1 US quart graduated cylinder multiple times, and then draw that second line.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  4. #4

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    i have a faucet with a thermometer and a 5gallon bucket.

  5. #5
    chriscrawfordphoto's Avatar
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    I think he is asking about heating the water to 120 degrees to dissolve the powder. This has to be done all at once, you can't just measure some of the powder to dissolve. I use a glass Pyrex one-liter measuring glass, and I heat the water in it in the microwave. This has to be done in several batches, of course, since the container won't hold a whole gallon (my microwave will not hold a container big enough to do a whole gallon, so i use the one-liter one instead). I do the actual mixing in a one-gallon bucket.
    Chris Crawford
    Fine Art Photography of Indiana and other places no one else photographs.

    http://www.chriscrawfordphoto.com

    My Tested Developing Times with the films and developers I use

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    Fort Wayne, Indiana

  6. #6

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    I think he is mixing up the 1 gallon powder to make the stock solution.
    Go to the hardware store and look for the buckets/pots that painters use for holding paint in.
    They come in various sizes and are clear plastic with volume markings on the side.

    You could use any container if you measure out the volume you need using smaller graduates and then placing the volume you need in the larger container, then mark to level.

  7. #7

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    My hot water heater gets me 120F out of the darkroom tap if I run it for a bit, so that takes care of itself.

    Here's a gallon graduate:

    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc..._Graduate.html

    You can also get a 5000ml plastic beaker from scientific supply houses, for example:

    http://www.amazon.com/Beaker-With-Ha...dp/B00CDGVFFS/

    I've used plastic pails, too.
    Last edited by Oren Grad; 09-28-2013 at 09:41 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #8

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    Simple. I measure out 101 oz of water (per Kodak's instructions on the package) and put it in a cooking pot on the stove. Heat the water w/ a thermometer in it (I usually heat it to around 130 degrees or a little more), then dump it into my plastic pail that's sitting on the top of the stove next to the pot, and switch on the vent fan above. I already have my packet of D76 open, and slowly pour it into the pail of hot water whilst stirring well w/ a big, long plastic spoon I use for this purpose only (Dollar Tree 5 Pc variety pack). I also always use eye protection and a bandana over my mouth and nose just in case. Once it's mixed, I top up the pail w/ another 27 oz of hot water out of the tap, stir well, and pour it into one of those 1 gal brown plastic bottles from Freestyle. After it has set for 24 hours I pour it into smaller 16 oz brown bottles, label them w/ the date they were bottled, and use them up that way. D76, in my house anyway, does not like heat or long storage, so it gets used up within a month (I prefer using it full strength in my developing scheme). My preference would be to use D76 one shot because as it sits over time it can mess w/ my consistency, but I do not like mixing open powders more than necessary due to health risks. I am also not sure that dividing up D76 powder would work well, as it is a mixture of different chemicals, and who knows if each small mix would contain the right proportion of chemicals.
    Last edited by momus; 09-29-2013 at 01:36 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #9

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    How about heating up 3 liters of water, dissolve powder, add 0.8 liter of cold water = voila a gallon of fresh D-76...

  10. #10
    bobwysiwyg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pat Erson View Post
    How about heating up 3 liters of water, dissolve powder, add 0.8 liter of cold water = voila a gallon of fresh D-76...
    Ditto. I do use a large graduate and hot tap water (120F) and mix per Kodak directions otherwise. Never had any problems.
    WYSIWYG - At least that's my goal.

    Portfolio-http://apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=25518

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