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  1. #11

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    The only way that I use D-76 diluted is 1:1. If I use D-76 1:1, I mix 250 ml D-76 stock to 250 ml water for one 36 exposure roll of film and use this as a one shot. The 250ml of stock is the minimum amount to use and get consistent results.
    Dave

    "She's always out making pictures, She's always out making scenes.
    She's always out the window, When it comes to making Dreams.

    It's all mixed up, It's all mixed up, It's all mixed up."

    From It's All Mixed Up by The Cars

  2. #12

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    Okay, from responses i think i got my answers, through your guys responses.
    Just to clarify, i did stop experimenting about 2 months ago, and began being as consistent as possible. i thought i would stick to 1+3 dilutions and saw that 100ml of developer simple enough.


    1. If i use the intended amount of developer at current dilution i would have 1L working solution and my negatives would indeed be contrastier as they are currently flat (don't think i would want this)

    2/2.5 I guess by not using the full amount of developer, i was not getting Blown Out highlights (correct?).

    As for edge data, it is not extremely dark or clear. Looking back through negatives, there's a clear point where you can tell i began to develop 1+3, and looking through them I think it's just my printing which has gotten better throughout this time, along with my improvement in consistency.

    While i was at one point wanting extremely contrasty photos, i found this somewhat restricting with 36 photos. The flat negatives i have now are due to exhausted developer.

    What i will do is develop 1+1 as mentioned above with a couple of rolls and see how i like that.

  3. #13
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mesantacruz View Post

    2/2.5 I guess by not using the full amount of developer, i was not getting Blown Out highlights (correct?).
    I would say instead that your highlights weren't fully developed - and in many cases were probably underdeveloped.

    It is better to reduce contrast by reducing time, because it will have a more predictable effect on all the tones from mid-tones through the highlights.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by mopar_guy View Post
    The only way that I use D-76 diluted is 1:1. If I use D-76 1:1, I mix 250 ml D-76 stock to 250 ml water for one 36 exposure roll of film and use this as a one shot. The 250ml of stock is the minimum amount to use and get consistent results.
    I beg to differ. If you look on the bottom of a Paterson tank it states 295ml for one 35mm film. 500ml is for 120 and Matt mentions using a litre?

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

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  5. #15

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    I've seen discussions about the minimum amount of stock D76 for one roll of 135 or one roll of 120 hashed over many times here and elsewhere. It's still unclear to me.
    The Kodak datasheet says
    Quote Originally Posted by Kodak
    If you use D-76 Developer diluted 1:1, dilute it just before
    you use it, and discard it after processing the batch of film ...
    You can develop one 135-3 roll (80 square inches)
    in 473 mL (16 ounces) or two rolls together in 946 mL
    (one quart) of diluted developer. If you process one
    135-36 roll in a 237 mL (8-ounce) tank or two 135-36 rolls
    in a 473 mL (16-ounce) tank, increase the development time
    by 10 percent
    One way of interpreting this is that the minimum amount of stock to be used for a single roll is ~250ml and so 1+1 requires a total volume of ~500ml including the diluent.

    In other places I've seen different interpretations, and I've seen other folk say 100ml stock is enough for a roll.

  6. #16
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    I beg to differ. If you look on the bottom of a Paterson tank it states 295ml for one 35mm film. 500ml is for 120 and Matt mentions using a litre?
    If you need 250ml of stock solution to fully develop a film, at 1+3 dilution, you have to add 750ml (since that is 3x the developer stock solution, implied by the 1+3 dilution).
    That makes for 1l solution.

    I get better prints from negatives that are fully developed, and find underdeveloped negatives, especially when compensating development occurred, very difficult to print. Particularly portraits.

    To the original poster, it sounds like you are getting results that you are OK with, but then you ask whether you think more fully developed negatives would benefit you.
    I say you might, because that's how I like to print them, but I like really rich tonality with deep fat blacks and vibrant highlights. If you like more muted tones, you should probably stick to what you're doing. There are no rules for what you must do.
    However, if you need to go to a #5 filter to get the zing you want from your prints, AND employ a split printing technique that definitely is most beneficial for high contrast negatives, then that suggests to me that you might want to try developing your negatives a bit longer as they seem under-developed.
    Start small, add just a little, like 10% more. Give it a fair shake, and see how you like it. I very much doubt you will block up your highlights doing this, but if you do it's easy to revert, and at least then you will know.

    Only you can fully answer the question, by trying it. Don't dismiss it until you try.
    Last edited by Thomas Bertilsson; 10-04-2013 at 07:37 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

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  7. #17
    cliveh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    If you need 250ml of stock solution to fully develop a film, at 1+3 dilution, you have to add 750ml (since that is 3x the developer stock solution, implied by the 1+3 dilution).
    That makes for 1l solution.
    But you don't need 250ml of stock solution (neat dev) to develop one film at a ratio of 1:3 with water. For one 35mm film you need a total final volume of 295ml (Paterson tank) and for one 120 film you need a total final volume of 500ml (Paterson tank).

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

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  8. #18

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    If 250 is the minimum amount of developer needed, and you're diluting 1:3 you need a tank that can hold 1 L, otherwise the film doesn't have enough developer available.
    If the tank only holds 295 ml, there is not enough developer available to do the job, even though the ratio of what's there is 1:3.

    To the OP, what are you looking to accomplish with the 1:3 dilution?

  9. #19
    cliveh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bdial View Post
    If 250 is the minimum amount of developer needed, and you're diluting 1:3 you need a tank that can hold 1 L, otherwise the film doesn't have enough developer available.
    If the tank only holds 295 ml, there is not enough developer available to do the job, even though the ratio of what's there is 1:3.

    To the OP, what are you looking to accomplish with the 1:3 dilution?
    Who says 250ml is the minimum amount of neat developer needed to develop one 35mm film. That would imply that I need 500ml of final working solution to develop at 1:1, which I don't.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    Who says 250ml is the minimum amount of neat developer needed to develop one 35mm film. That would imply that I need 500ml of final working solution to develop at 1:1, which I don't.
    which is exactly the point of my post above http://www.apug.org/forums/viewpost.php?p=1554055

    Of course cliveh may have me "ignored" in which case he won;t see this either ...

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