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  1. #1

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    Photography Club

    I'm going to start teaching a photography club soon, but I was wondering, since I'm going to buy my film in bulk, what type of film to use??

    When I started photography last year, I used Ilford FP4 125, the results were good as in perfect grayscale range.
    But When I started experimenting with the loads of film options out there, I saw that the Delta brands were good.

    So should I buy Delta 100, Delta 400, or FP4 125?

  2. #2

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    I love Delta films, both 100 and 400. Good contrast and good grain, and I am in pig heaven!! Don

  3. #3
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    Depends on what you're after. The 400 speed allows easier use of filters, and people can shoot faster shutter speeds generally. However, there is more grain. That might be good or bad, depending on expectations. Delta 100 is very sharp and has low grain. I mostly shoot FP4 in 35mm because I am after a more retro look than the sharper Delta and TMax films. I only use prewar cameras though, and deliberately after a more vintage look.


    Kent in SD

  4. #4
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    I would suggest you give them the choice of FP4 or HP5 and explain the difference. T grain films require about double the fixation time and standard B&W films are closer to real film during the history of film photography.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  5. #5

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    T-max 400 is a good choice.

    Jeff

  6. #6
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    If it can only be one film I'd go with a 400 speed for this time of year. Go for the best value. More is better for students.

  7. #7

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    In the end it probably all a matter of personal taste whether you prefer the modern T-grain films like Ilford's Delta 100/400/3200 or the more "vintage" types like FP4 and HP5 (or equivalent from other manufacturers). I'm a Delta 100 & 400 user as I don't care for a vintage look. I want fine grain and sharpness and the Delta 100 & 400 films in DD-X or Perceptol work for me. I haven't experimented with other films or developers. Since you'll likely be competing with digital, I think that you should probably aim for the latest (and greates?) in film technology instead of vintage. People can always back off a bit and pursue the vintage look. Maybe spend a bit of time showing the difference between the T-grain films and the "vintage" type films. Or see what's locally available (if any) and stick to that. That will give your club members a chance to continue with the materials that you teach with.

    Menno

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by akitak9821 View Post
    I'm going to start teaching a photography club soon, but I was wondering, since I'm going to buy my film in bulk, what type of film to use??

    When I started photography last year, I used Ilford FP4 125, the results were good as in perfect grayscale range.
    But When I started experimenting with the loads of film options out there, I saw that the Delta brands were good.

    So should I buy Delta 100, Delta 400, or FP4 125?
    I find Delta 100 beautiful but more finicky than the other two.

    FP4 and Delta 400 are the 35mm b&w films I regularly buy at retail, both are easy to use and provide great results. (I do buy other films but typically its only when I find a bargain.)

    FP4 is truly a joy to use, beautiful and easy to work with as long as you have enough light.

    If I had to pick just one of these films though, it would be Delta 400 without question or hesitation; the 1-2/3 stops in speed difference and it's ability to cope with a larger range EI choices simply makes it much easier to shoot.

    I do try to meter well and shoot my Delta 400 accurately at 400-500 but I will happily shoot Delta 400 anywhere from EI 50 to EI 3200 if needed. Delta 400's flexibility/latitude means if I'm in a hurry I can just use aperture priority or if using a manual camera I can just skip readjusting exposure and shoot knowing I'll get a workable negative either way.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  9. #9

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    Ditto for T-Max 400.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by spijker View Post
    I'm a Delta 100 & 400 user as I don't care for a vintage look.Menno
    That's the first time I have heard of films like FP4 and HP5 being of vintage look.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

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