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  1. #31
    jnanian's Avatar
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    hi mrrred:

    to be honest i don't think it really matters the sort of fixer used ... i was always told to use speed fixer
    mainly because, well, when i learned photo-stuff the teachers used sprint chemistry (speed fixer ), and not old skool hypo ...
    but the more i read and think about it, it seems to matter less and less, and it seems a lot easier to use hypo than speed fixer ( low tech )
    i think you are probably right about the cast, from what i remember whenever i got "it" i just washed the film a little
    more and it went away, not necessarily over fix ... i was just being a parrot to be honest
    " squawk use speed fixer to get rid of the magenta cast, squawk"

    john

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rudeofus View Post
    The main "side effect" is that Sodium Thiosulfate takes over three times as long as Ammonium Thiosulfate to fix film at the same molar concentration. Since T-grain films seem to be notoriously hard to fix properly (as indicated by the magenta cast that weak or used fixer leaves on the film), people tend to use the best fixers possible for these films.
    hi rudeofus

    i was more concerned with using the salt to stabilize and then fixing,
    thinking that too much fix or salt or that "stuff" could bleach the film
    or paper as i have always heard (but not experienced) over fixing will do ...

    john

  3. #33
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    Would there be a difference between rock or sea salt?
    Get it right in the camera, the first time... My flickr
    Peter Carter

  4. #34

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    The real test for complete fixing is to use the Kodak test solution. if residual silver is present this would be shown by a color independent of any film dyes.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Johnson View Post
    Hello PU,
    I'm not familiar with the early work but here it is stated that Fox Talbot used a concentrated salt solution for fixing in his early work so yes I think fixing would be permanent:
    http://www.flickr.com/groups/1924221...7629895741409/
    The works fixed in salt were not archival the ones survived were stored in complete darkness for the entirety of their exhistance par viewing by dim light


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  6. #36
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    Hi, I am the guy, Chronocrator, that started this at Flickr!

    Why did you use 150g/600ml and not 150g/500ml? According to my long experiments, a small increase in concentration brings a lot in fixing time. If you want to repeat this make following: put 150g salt in a heat resistant beaker and pour 500 ml very hot water, just boiled, and stir until most of the salt is diluted. This takes several minutes, maybe 20. Then filter the solution with coffee filter. This solution will not recrystallize for 24 hours and better if you dissolve some other salt in it like Potassium Bromide. Then try this for fixing films. If you use normal grain films like Ilfolrd FP4 or Fomapan 100 and so on, it will take less than 24 hours. T grain films need 48 hours or more to be (bad) fixed but scannable.
    Regards!

  7. #37

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    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daguerreotype
    Re fixing:"Daguerre's initial method was to use a hot saturated solution of common salt"
    This is the earliest use probably, but in a different type process to Fox Talbot.

  8. #38
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    I think we need to stop using the word fixed in relation to salt, as it is merely stabilised.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

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