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  1. #11

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    Oxidation is only part of the issue. Heat plays a large roll as well. I use D76 in those brown plastic bottles from Freestyle, as well as a couple of accordion plastic bottles. This works fine, but 4-5 weeks is all I'll go w/ this developer. I like the wine bottle idea (any excuse to buy more vino rosso is a good one). Don't have any caps for them though, and I had no success trying to just put a cork in a bottle full of developer, so for now the bottles are for a nice decorative display.

  2. #12
    GRHazelton's Avatar
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    Canned air??

    Any thoughts on using canned air to exclude air from developer bottles? Since the canister warns against using near ignition sources I assume the stuff is flammable, perhaps propane, butane? Would be necessary to keep canister more or less upright and release the gas through the furnished wand gently, to avoid splashing, etc. Since I have this stuff around for dusting off negs prior to scanning or enlarging it would be really handy.

  3. #13
    GRHazelton's Avatar
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    Since chemical reactions roughly double/halve in speed with each 10 degree C change, storage in the fridge sounds good ... or is it? Any thoughts on using a fridge at perhaps 35 F? Would there be a problem with precipitations which wouldn't then redisolve?

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by GRHazelton View Post
    Since chemical reactions roughly double/halve in speed with each 10 degree C change, storage in the fridge sounds good ... or is it? Any thoughts on using a fridge at perhaps 35 F? Would there be a problem with precipitations which wouldn't then redisolve?
    Yes, there will problem with precipitation, and it will be difficult to redisolve. Most of the solutions are nearly saturated.

    As far as vacuum corks holding their seal for a long time - I've left partial wine bottles with them for a week or more, and they still seem to be sealed. Not that its good for the wine, it's just that we were on vacation and a partial bottle got left at home.
    Bruce

    Moma don't take my Kodachrome away!
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    BruceCSdunekPhotography.zenfolio.com

  5. #15

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    I am using a system of vacuum wine stoppers too and it has definitely improved the longevity of my darkroom chemicals. Using fix for papers over months (low frequency, though) can be done with no problems, whereas I had problems with fix going stinky (very sour) in non-vacuumized bottles, in particular if they only half full.

    if the bottle is filled full or just to a quarter seemingly doesn't matter as long as the vacuum is kept. unfortunately, you can only really check the next time you open the bottle, as there is usually a 'pop' if the vacuum was kept and no such sound if it wasn't. i usually put a drop of water (or spit, for that matter) around the very area of the stopper that would contact the bottle before pumping the air out of it and it generally holds up very well. for me the method has solved about any oxidation problem i have come across in the past, so i can only advise you to stick with it, in particular if you already have the equipment.

  6. #16
    bvy
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    Quote Originally Posted by GRHazelton View Post
    Any thoughts on using canned air to exclude air from developer bottles? Since the canister warns against using near ignition sources I assume the stuff is flammable, perhaps propane, butane? Would be necessary to keep canister more or less upright and release the gas through the furnished wand gently, to avoid splashing, etc. Since I have this stuff around for dusting off negs prior to scanning or enlarging it would be really handy.
    Do you mean canned air in general, or the "dust off" stuff? I would avoid the latter. Look into a product called Bloxygen. It's nonflammable and inert (argon). Displacement is still my number one method, however.

  7. #17
    Jim Noel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    Hi Russel,

    The wine stoppers are a fine idea, especially if you are recycling a bottle that can use it.

    Some people add marbles to their bottles to "top up" the fluid in bottle and eliminate any air space before capping, that works with any cap. Others use accordion style collapsable bottles.

    For bottles holding small amounts of chemical I just displace the air with a shot propane/butane.

    My favorite method of storage of prepared chemicals is a "wine box"; once it's empty it gets a good bath, then I make up the chemical and pour it in the bladder, reinsert the valve, expel all the air, then put it back in the box. This allows dispensing without introducing any air into the storage container.

    All of these methods help and are worth doing, but none give me the confidence to go much past the manufacturers recommended storage times.

    Simply put, the cost of the chemicals is so small compared to the rest the costs of getting a shot that it simply isn't worth messing with.
    My experience with the wine boxes is that the bladders permit osmosis over fairly short periods of time, thus allowing oxygen to enter. THe "wine pumps" work pretty well.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

  8. #18
    Nikola Dulgiarov's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GRHazelton View Post
    Any thoughts on using canned air to exclude air from developer bottles? Since the canister warns against using near ignition sources I assume the stuff is flammable, perhaps propane, butane? Would be necessary to keep canister more or less upright and release the gas through the furnished wand gently, to avoid splashing, etc. Since I have this stuff around for dusting off negs prior to scanning or enlarging it would be really handy.
    Canned air generally consists of polyfluorinated alkanes - di-,tri-, tetrafloroethane. They're heavier than air and reasonably inert. Burning does release fluorine compounds, so be careful.

  9. #19
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    I was very surprised by how well they work - raided some my folks had been given (they had plenty!!!) and stoppered a couple of bottles of dev. 6 months later it was still *very* useable. I couldn't detect any oxidisation and it worked perfectly.

    Longer than 6 months? Not sure - it will certainly be there when I visit AU again, so I guess I'll find out sooner or later, just how good they do seal a bottle.

  10. #20
    MattKing's Avatar
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    I'm wondering if their greatest effect is improving the strength of the seal of the cork/stopper.

    Because otherwise it just seems that the reduction in oxygen in the bottle would be minimal.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

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