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Thread: Kodak Monobath

  1. #21
    AgX
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    It was marketed for some years. Impossible tries to make us believe they were the first to market b&w integral instant film, as that Polaroid film is merely known.

  2. #22

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    I'm not quite sure where this came from:

    Kodak monobath film developer-fixer (1961)
    Sodium sulfite 50 g
    Phenidone 4 g
    Hydroquinone 12 g
    Sodium thiosulfate (penta) 110 g
    Sodium hydroxide 4 g
    Develop film 4 - 7 minutes at 23C (or until fully fixed)
    To mix, add the Phenidone to the water, but do not mix. Add a pinch of the hydroquinone. Add the remaining ingredients in the order given, and mix to dissolve the Phenidone. Then add the remaining hydroquinone. Dissolve the sodium hydroxide separately in a small volume of water before adding it to the mix.

  3. #23
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    I was working with monobaths for a while and occasionally come back to it as circumstances demand it. The attraction at the time was to be able to process film in limited space with fewer trays, storage bottles, etc. Another attraction might be to process sheet film with less handling, say one sheet of ULF at a time.

    In fact the results were quite good, and if you like the Type 55 look, a slow to medium speed traditional film (I was fond of Efke PL100) in a monobath (I was using mainly fx6a) is kind of it. Haist argues that you can tweak a monobath to give results similar to D-76, and that fits with my experience.

    The problem with a monobath is that without exotic and expensive chemicals, it tends to self-destruct once you start using it, so you have to mix it up and use it in one session, or at most within two days, or fixed out silver, the fixer, and the developer all start interacting to produce sludge and to exhaust the developer. You also need kind of a lot of developing agent to compete with the fixer, so it could get costly in large quantities.

    There's a long monobath thread around here with lots of formulas, info, and sample images.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  4. #24

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    Hi David thanks for the info. I know that there is a long thread about monobath. But my question was really if anyone has more info on the Kodak monobath that is sold for use with x-ray film. And if anyone has some hands on experience with the stuff. No answer yet
    Reality is whatever stays when you stop believing in it.
    darkroomninja.blogspot.com

  5. #25
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Grant Haist MM-1

    Quote Originally Posted by nworth View Post
    I'm not quite sure where this came from:

    Kodak monobath film developer-fixer (1961)
    Sodium sulfite 50 g
    Phenidone 4 g
    Hydroquinone 12 g
    Sodium thiosulfate (penta) 110 g
    Sodium hydroxide 4 g
    Develop film 4 - 7 minutes at 23C (or until fully fixed)
    To mix, add the Phenidone to the water, but do not mix. Add a pinch of the hydroquinone. Add the remaining ingredients in the order given, and mix to dissolve the Phenidone. Then add the remaining hydroquinone. Dissolve the sodium hydroxide separately in a small volume of water before adding it to the mix.

    It's Grant Haist's NN-1 formula. It can contain Gluteraldehyde 25% 8ml (hardener) to prevent softening of the emulsion.


    Grant Haist's Monobath MM-1

    Sodium Sulphite (Anhyd) 50.0g
    Hydroquinone 12.0g
    Phenidone 4.0g
    Sodium Hydroxide 4.0g
    Sodium Thiosulphate 110.0g
    Gluteraldehyde 25% 8ml
    Water to 1 litre

    Do not dilute for use.
    Process for 6 min's at 20c. Agitation for first 30 seconds then 15 sec's every minute on the minute. To adjust the contrast use greater or lesser amounts of Hypo. Use of more will result in a softer image, less increases contrast.

    Ian

  6. #26
    Cor
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    You all know that gluteraldehyde is nasty stuff, right ?

    Best,

    Cor

  7. #27
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cor View Post
    You all know that gluteraldehyde is nasty stuff, right ?

    Best,

    Cor
    So dangerous that it's sold in the chemists as a 10% solution as wart treatment and has no effect on surrounding skin, it's also used in the manufacture of vaccines.

    There plenty of common photographic and household chemicals that are far more dangerous.

    Ian

  8. #28

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    I think this thread can be closed since nobody has experience with the Kodak monobath.
    Reality is whatever stays when you stop believing in it.
    darkroomninja.blogspot.com

  9. #29
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    No reason to close it. Someone might come up with an answer in six months or two years and can continue the discussion, as with any thread. Or if you get some interesting results, you can post them here.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  10. #30
    Cor
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    So dangerous that it's sold in the chemists as a 10% solution as wart treatment and has no effect on surrounding skin, it's also used in the manufacture of vaccines.

    There plenty of common photographic and household chemicals that are far more dangerous.

    Ian
    Well Ian your last remark is a bit of a "dooddoener" as we say in Dutch, a platitude as in water is dangerous you can drown in it, I am not saying one should not use it, but if you look here:

    http://www.sigmaaldrich.com/catalog/...g=en&region=NL

    You'll see for 25% Glutaraldehyde:

    Personal Protective Equipment Faceshields, full-face respirator (US), Gloves, Goggles, multi-purpose combination respirator cartridge (US), type ABEK (EN14387) respirator filter

    I think it's important that people should be aware of the stuff they work with..

    Best,

    Cor

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