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  1. #51
    Black Dog's Avatar
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    I've been everywhere ooooohhh yeaahhhh still I'm standing tall.
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    ISTR the Kodak ones were especially hard to open-do Kodak think all photographers are more ripped than Arnie?....
    "He took to writing poetry and visiting the elves: and though many shook their heads and touched their foreheads and said 'Poor old Baggins!' and though few believed any of his tales, he remained very happy till the end of his days, and those were extraordinarily long "- JRR Tolkien, ' The Hobbit '.

  2. #52

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    At last I developed my first film.

    I had to practice over and over again with loading the film inside the bag. Then as I was doing it one of the elastic arm bands bust and I forgot sissors. So I had to retreat an arm making sure there was no direct light path.

    I had a water bath with the chemicals ready. The opened fixer someone gave me turned out to have floaters in it so I had to turn to my original query of using Barclay fixer (expired 1996!!!). It was never opened and looked clear so I chanced it. It said 20-40 seconds for any B&W film so I gave it about 40, then rinsed the film inside the canister under the tap for 10 minutes and finalised with a few drops of wetting agent for 2 minutes.

    Now up in the bathroom drying and the film clips I got are a great job, they pearce and lock through the film and one of them is weighted.

    Even with my amateur eye the negatives look healthy enough. I was using a modern flash on a Pentax ME Super and I just estimated exposure.

    I would love to see these. My proposed darkroom is perhaps too tiny (according to Ansel Adams LOL). Is there a way to see the prints without enlarging them? I'm not sure when or if I can get a darkroom running. I'm tempted to get a good scanner (APUG strike me down!) and this would only be to view them, send them around AND show my work here!

    I'm really surprised it worked at all given that the fixer was ancient! Very satisfied with my first attempt and I bought Kenco acetate negative storage files for my work. Is it true that you can make a contact print straight through them? These were twice the price of glassine ones.

  3. #53
    polyglot's Avatar
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    40s is not nearly enough time in fixer. The usual would be 3 to 5 minutes in rapid fixer, probably 10 minutes in non-rapid fixer. If there is the slightest bit of milkiness or brown staining, fix the film again for longer.

    In terms of seeing the photos, you can scan it (questions about that are banned on APUG) or you can contact-print it (do some googling), which gives you prints the same size ad the negative so a whole roll will fit on a single 8x10 page.

  4. #54

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    Quote Originally Posted by nocturnal View Post
    I'm really surprised it worked at all given that the fixer was ancient!
    You might not see the effects of under fixing for years... as recommended above, wack it back in for a few minutes.

  5. #55

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    Yes I too thought it should have been around 3 minutes although the instructions specifically stated 20-40 seconds so I went for 40.

    It was quite a concentrated mix 1:3 so I used 100ml straight from the bottle (if this makes any difference to the logic).

    I will try a contact print soon, I have paper developer expiry 1996 but I'll go for new stuff!

    Put it back in again?

  6. #56
    Terry Christian's Avatar
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    I always fix for at least five minutes, and up to about seven if I've reused my fixer a few times.

    A quick and dirty way to preview your images is to shoot them against a bright white background with a digital camera or smartphone, and invert with Photoshop or similar app.

  7. #57
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    A little tip for fixer. When you snip the end off your 35mm film to load it onto the reel, keep the clipped end. Mix up some new fixer according to the strength you intend to use. (1:4 for ilford). Put one spot of fixer on the clip and it will make a clear spot. Now dip the whole clip in the fixer and time it to see how long it takes to clear completely so you can no longer see the initial spot. probably be somewhere around a minute. This means that with brand new fixer 2 minutes is ample clearing time. However as the fixer ages, clearing time gets longer. Use your film clips to keep track of your fixer and when the initial time to clear hits double the original fresh fixer time, junk it and start again. Aged fixer time to clear can be 2 minutes, so appropriate time in fixer is 4-5 minutes to be safe at normal temperatures.

    My proposed darkroom is perhaps too tiny
    How big? I work very comfortably in a space 1.3m x 2m.

    A quick and dirty way to preview your images is to shoot them against a bright white background with a digital camera or smartphone
    An even quicker and dirtier way is to use the "positron" ap for iphone which inverts what the camera sees.

  8. #58

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    Well that's a roll of film wasted then! Why would the manufacturer state 20-40 seconds is beyond me. I wanted to stick to the recommended time as I read too much fixing ruins a film in several ways.

    I do have an all in one flat-bed-scanner, a recent one, it can't scan film but surely I could scan it and invert it with software.

    Update: I tried it with a colour negative there and it has a very blue hue.

    Mr. Rusty, I measured my proposed space there, 1.6m x 0.76m with a sloping roof for the stairs (this is no good)

  9. #59
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Just re-fix the film properly in regular fixer as soon as you are able. Then re-wash it. It will be fine.

    I bet your fixer is designed for dental X-ray film, and therefore is very concentrated. The machines in dentist's offices were designed to develop X-ray film very quickly.

    It may still be functional for regular film, but I wouldn't chance it.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  10. #60

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    The OP is not the first beginner to mention that the instructions said 20-40 secs so such instructions do exist although I cannot remember whose instructions. The reason might be as Matt has conjectured

    I have never seen such instructions with Ilford, Nova or Tetenal fixers.

    OP do the instructions mention X-Ray film or otherwise suggest that this time isn't for normal film?

    pentaxuser



 

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