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  1. #1

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    Mystery Film to develop

    Hi all, a guy at my woodwork class gave me this film to process that he found in somebody's odds and ends. Could anyone advise me what sort of film it is and whether it will still be processable? Also possible times/dilutions etc...

    Many thanks, Gareth
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Ilford Film.jpg  

  2. #2
    Dr Croubie's Avatar
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    Given that it's Ilford, it's pretty much going to be Black and White, and almost anything will develop in a Rodinal stand. (whether there's anything on it above the base fog will be interesting). I've heard HC110 is good for cutting through fog on old films, but i've never used it...
    An awful lot of electrons were terribly inconvenienced in the making of this post.

    f/64 and be there.

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    Fixcinater's Avatar
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    I just shot and souped the first roll out of a bulk Ilford roll, dated 1973. It's only labeled "Mk.V Film" for identification.

    5ml of HC110 + water to cover. 25c, 8 minutes. Looks quite good for something that old, not knowing anything about it's speed or any other characteristics.

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    Newt_on_Swings's Avatar
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    Just use what you have, no point in going out of your way to get a special developer just for one random roll. If you have HC110 id say go dilution B, and develop it warm and fast 75f and maybe 4-5min to really cut the fog. You can also try two bath developers that take out the timing aspect of it as well like diafine.

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    This may be the long discontinued Ilford Selochrome film. I think it went off the production line perhaps 40 years ago. Google the Ilford company in Mobberley in Cheshire, and send them an E mail or speak to their tech department and ask their advice. They are usually very helpful
    Last edited by BMbikerider; 10-17-2013 at 04:42 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #6
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    You'll have to see-saw the film through a tray of developer as it's larger than 120. I have the original dev times for all the old Ilford films and I'd suggest 12 mins in ID-11/D76 @ 20ºC, or whatever you'd use for FP4+ but increase the time by 25%. That works for older films,

    Ian

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    Regular Rod's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jarvman View Post
    Hi all, a guy at my woodwork class gave me this film to process that he found in somebody's odds and ends. Could anyone advise me what sort of film it is and whether it will still be processable? Also possible times/dilutions etc...

    Many thanks, Gareth

    It's a roll of 116 not 120 I think. You will need to develop it with either a spaced out spiral to get the gap right, or in a big deep tray like a washing up bowl in which you can manually agitate the film through the developer without catching and scratching it on the bottom of the tray. Big film clips like the Patterson clips on each end may help you to lay it down on one edge, between agitations, without it spiralling out of control and being damaged. Of course if you have access to deep tanks you simply manipulate it in your usual way. If it was me I'd carefully unwind the film a little bit and use a rubber band on a rule to measure in the dark how wide the film was edge to edge. Then wind it back, tape it and put it safely on one side in a lightproof container. Then work out some way of spacing a spool (maybe with rubber bands on the shaft) at the right width for the film's dimensions and then develop it semi-stand (after a pre-soak in water) with a compensating developer and a generous amount of time. What developers do you have available?


    It would be good to see what you find on there...


    RR

  8. #8
    Bruce Robbins's Avatar
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    Here's some good info on old Ilford products that might be interesting if not useful:
    http://www.photomemorabilia.co.uk/Il...hronology.html

    A two bath developer is another way to go but stand development is probably easier and there are other developers aside from Rodinal you can use although it's likely the best for that purpose. Good luck with the film!
    The Online Darkroom
    www.theonlinedarkroom.com

  9. #9

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    yeah, it's 116 -- if you have an old Yankee reel tank that goes that wide (I have one!) you can do it that way, otherwise it's tray -- get it wet so it's easier to handle and then hold it so the reverse curl makes it hold a giant U shape and rock it back and forth in a tray or open tank for both dev and fix.

    lacking any hard data, if it's b/w (safe assumption) try d-76, 1:1 for 10 minutes and pray.

  10. #10
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    D76 1+1 for 10 minutes will give under-development , all the old Ilford films needed 8½-10 minutes in Full Strength ID-11/D76 and you need to add a little extra time for older films as the contrast will have dropped slightly.

    Ian

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