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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Miller
    John, I find your comment of interest, and would be gratefull if you could expand on it. If developement of a Fibre print is complete; what further changes do you experience by further development?
    I know what you both mean. My own experience is that the flexibility window for FB is wide, perhaps from 1 min 15 seconds to 4-5 minutes, during which time the print keeps changing, but to a lesser extent after about 2.5 minutes (for me in my darkroom. I guess that means that at the 2-2.5 mins I normally use the paper is only 95% developed or so. I think this is what AA meant by in his factorial method examples where contrast could be varied a fair old bit with dev time. In contrast I found that RC papers have a narrow window. Too short and it is underdeveloped. Just right is just right, but any longer makes little to no difference

    I guess it mens that RC is pretty well always developed to completion and FB is not?

    Tom

  2. #12

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    Thanks for the replies everyone, some helpful information. I appreciate it all! This well definately be useful.
    "Where is beauty? Where I must will with my whole Will; where I will love and perish, that an image may not remain merely an image."

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Miller
    John, I find your comment of interest, and would be gratefull if you could expand on it. If developement of a Fibre print is complete; what further changes do you experience by further development?
    Sorry Dave - just read your question. Tom answered well.
    With RC paper (which as we know was originally produced to obtain quick prints that also dry quickly) there is a consistency to development. Once you hit the 60-90 secs, you can be sure there will be no benefit to further developing (or at least changes would be imperceptable).
    But there are variables that will make a significant difference to the look of prints made on FB paper. Because the rate of development of FB is much slower, variations in the dilution of developer will make a perceptable difference to the contrast of the image. Additionally for example; water bath development (causing developer d[color=black][font=Times New Roman][font=Verdana][size=2]epletion in the shadows, while allowing the highlights to develop at a greater proportional rate than normal) will give quite a different look to the image.[/size][/font][/font][/color]
    [color=black][font=Times New Roman][font=Verdana][/font][/font][/color]
    [color=black][font=Times New Roman][font=Verdana][size=2]If your personal std development time for FB prints is 120secs, this will produce a different look to your images than those developed to 180sec, from the same neg.[/size][/font][/font][/color]
    [color=black][font=Times New Roman][font=Verdana][/font][/font][/color]
    [color=black][font=Times New Roman][font=Verdana][size=2]So I guess I was saying that there are very significant s[color=black][font=Times New Roman][size=3][font=Verdana][size=2]ubtleties[/size][/font] [/size][/font][/color]that can take effect with FB paper in the developer tray that are additional to what takes place under the enlarger. This is far less (if at all) [/size][/font][/font][/color][color=black][font=Times New Roman][font=Verdana][size=2]perceptable with RC paper.[/size][/font][/font][/color]

  4. #14
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    Thanks for the explanation. As someone that has to develope in a drum I have to ensure that any manipulation is taken care of at the exposure stage. I tend to forget therefore that there are opportunities to be had during the wet process.
    Regards Dave.

    An English Eye


  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Miller
    Thanks for the explanation. As someone that has to develope in a drum I have to ensure that any manipulation is taken care of at the exposure stage. I tend to forget therefore that there are opportunities to be had during the wet process.
    This is no handycap at all and I am very glad I learned this way as it has forced good habits I think. Otherwise I think chaos would have reigned supreme for me! I only alter development time from stadard if there is no other resort or easier option. I use a Nova slot processor, but can inspect the print very easily by lifting it out as it gets 'long dunks'. The consistency one gets from fixed dev times and exposure adjustments I think forces one to work quite precisely (and be able to visualise another 2-3% exposure for example). Even when I use trays, I still use a fixed time and redo the print if it is not what I want. The problem with snatching prints is that you introduce another variable. The exposure might not be long enough, so it is stewed longer (more contrast and density). The print still is not as wished, so what does one adjust, dev time? Exposure? Both? I prefer to adjust one at a time and sometimes it will be dev time. Mostly it is exposure/contrast.

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