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  1. #1

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    Following Ilfords directions?

    Greetings.

    Now I know this might seem strange to ask.. But I am wondering if I should really follow Ilford directions for developing RC paper.

    I am using Ilford Universal PQ paper developer 1+9, Ilfostop 1+19 and Ilford Rapid Fix 1+9.

    The directions on these bottles suggest I use the following times for RC paper. (I am using Ilford mgIV RC)

    Universal PQ: 1minute
    Ilfostop: 15 seconds
    Rapid Fix: 1minute
    wash: 2minutes in running water

    It has been a while since I actually read these instructions. I had been using 2 minute developer, 30 second stop, 4 minute fix and 5 minute wash because this is what I was instructed to do at one time with these chemicals. Would it be wise to change to these guidelines given by Ilford? They seem much to short to me! Especially the time in the fix and the wash.

    Does anyone have anything to add or comment on about using these chems at the times given by Ilford, or the times I had been using and any possible drawbacks of either? Any other suggestions would be great. I am deciding to put myself up against a wall and try to work with more consistant practices that match as close to the manufacturers guidelines as possible.

  2. #2
    titrisol's Avatar
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    The main advantage of RC is that no chemicals are (?) absorbed into the paper fibers but only in a thin layes of emulsion shielded by coats of polyethylene. So fixing and washing times should be very short.

    1. I develop by inspection, so the guide times don;t work for me.. but 2 minutes seems aout right

    2. Stop bath and fixer times are fine for RC paper

    3. wash time is short in RC, so 5 minutes in running water should do
    BUT since you are fixing for such along time, you may need to extend your wahs times.
    Mama took my APX away.....

  3. #3
    Dave Miller's Avatar
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    Stick with Ilford's times, they are more than long enough. Development should be over by about 30 seconds, so there is nothing to be gained by going over 60 seconds. Why not try developing say 4 identically exposed test prints for, say 30 - 45 - 60 and 90 seconds, and see if you can detect any difference in the results. I doubt that you will.
    Regards Dave.

    An English Eye


  4. #4

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    I tried that combination at the weekend except I use water as the stop and my experiences are the same as Daves posting. Good luck with the PQ, after all this time using MG I tried the PQ and have fallen in love with the look and beautiful tonal range.

  5. #5
    rbarker's Avatar
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    Most manufacturer's instructions include a few well-chosen "weasel words" to indicate they are suggested guidelines, and can be varied to suit individual circumstances and tastes. Doing the developer-time test Dave suggests is a great suggestion.
    [COLOR=SlateGray]"You can't depend on your eyes if your imagination is out of focus." -Mark Twain[/COLOR]

    Ralph Barker
    Rio Rancho, NM

  6. #6
    Joe Lipka's Avatar
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    Just did that this weekend. One minute is adequate. My rule of thumb is that the maximum black should show up at about 25% of the final development time. That's exactly what happened.
    Two New Projects! Light on China - 07/13/2014

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  7. #7
    ann
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    90 secs, 30 secs. 60 secs. are fairly standard times for RC paper.

    ilford's cool tone paper calls for 2 min. development times.

    we haven't tested that particular developer, but with a wide variety of test with many papers and developers we have just used the above standards

    development should be to completion, which means the full time, less times will create muddy uneven prints.

  8. #8

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    Just adding to Ann's comments:
    Unlike FB paper, once development is complete there will be no further changes to the image by additional development. So the 'look' of your image will come entirely from the exposure by the enlarger.

  9. #9
    Dave Miller's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by John McCallum
    Just adding to Ann's comments:
    Unlike FB paper, once development is complete there will be no further changes to the image by additional development. So the 'look' of your image will come entirely from the exposure by the enlarger.
    John, I find your comment of interest, and would be gratefull if you could expand on it. If developement of a Fibre print is complete; what further changes do you experience by further development?
    Regards Dave.

    An English Eye


  10. #10
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    Temperature is important too! While dev can be done by eye with RC, fix and wash can be compromised by a few degrees.
    ~John~
    --------------------------
    www.johnbrewerphotography.com
    There are 10 types of people in this world - those who understand binary and those who don't.

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