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  1. #1

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    Loading Hewes Stainless Reels-?

    I got sick of film getting stuck in clean Paterson reels and jamming and kinking my film and I found a Hewes Reel and bought a tank. I notice that when I load these, if I don't engage the first two sprockets on the prongs, the leader touches the next winding of film. How do I load these and prevent that/>

    Thanks

  2. #2

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    are those 35mm reels? If yes you can (before loading film in darkness or changing bag) retrieve film leader from 35mm cassette, trim it using scissors, engage sprockets on the beginning of the leader (you will have to pull more leader, just enough to engage sprockets, but it was exposed anyway while loading film into camera). Now in darkness or in changing bag (without opening the cassette) load the film, cut the end of the film (you can use cassette opening as a guide). This is how I was doing it with hewes reels.

  3. #3
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    You stick the film past the two prongs, the leader of the film going into the core of the reel. Let the prong engage in two sprockets that allows for enough film to stay in the core of the reel, but without sticking out the other side.

    Then spool the film up. The two prongs are there to make sure your film is perfectly aligned before you spool the rest of the film onto the reel. When I first got the Hewes reels for 35mm I thought it was difficult the first time, but once I figured out exactly how to load them, they are almost fool proof (because not even I screw up with them ).
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  4. #4

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    Bend the film slightly into an arc while loading--I learned this at the US Army photo school.

  5. #5

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    Thanks, I already knew the bending trick, I'm just having difficulty keeping the film aligned and without too much film sticking outside

  6. #6
    NedL's Avatar
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    Hmm... I try to hook the sprocket holes near the end ( the first or second sprocket hole ) but reading Thomas' post made me realize you could push more into the core and hook it further along... that would probably be easier. I'll try that next time.

    Getting the alignment straight is the main thing, and the sprocket holes make it easy with 135, but I always fumble a little with 120 clip to make sure it is really straight and sometimes that can cause "oyster shell" crescents on the last frame, although that hasn't happened to me for quit a while now ( why did I go and type that... really asking for it! )

  7. #7

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    try practicing in the light. helps to see it then to feel it.
    just my 0.02

  8. #8

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    Yeah, I gotta say that Hewes reels are my favorite - once you get the hang of them they are cake to load. Try practicing in the light a few times - hook the film on the last sprocket holes you can engage and then load normally, giving the film a kind of convex shape. It should go on pretty easily if you just get the last two sprockets engaged.

  9. #9

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    I cut the leader off in the changing bag. I kind of feel where it ends, snip it off, then load the reel with the first two holes.

  10. #10
    walbergb's Avatar
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    As mentioned, practice in the daylight with some unusable film. As for my $0.02 worth: I hold the reel in my left hand (film in my right) with my index finger located at the prongs. This serves two purposes: (1) it makes sure I am holding the reel in the correct direction, and (2) the left index finger is used to receive and guide the film onto the prongs. Using the index finger on my left hand, I find it easy to hook the leader onto any of the perforations I want.

    As for cutting the leader off, I borrowed a technique from my hairdresser (used to be called a barber!). After removing the film from the cassette, hold the leader between your index finger and middle finger with enough of the film protruding above your fingers so as to include the narrower portion and a bit (sorry, I don't know the technical term for this part of the film). Using scissors and these fingers as a guide, cut the leader above your fingers. I'm amazed at how consistent and square my cuts have become. However, with Hewes reels the leader doesn't need to be square or between the perforations.
    Bob Walberg

    The fix is in!

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