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  1. #1

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    Developing issues: what happened here?

    So I managed to mangle a film pretty badly (buckled edges) when it got jammed on a plastic reel, so I took it off and loaded it onto a Hewes and then developed it
    Then...this happened
    What happened here?
    Looks like developer didnt even go near that spot
    There is no other damage on other parts of the film
    The first few frames show some undeveloped spots on the rebate area too
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails DSC06977.JPG   DSC06978.JPG  

  2. #2
    MattKing's Avatar
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    The film ended up overlapping itself - if two sections of film are stuck together, the chemicals cannot get to the emulsion.

    Every developing reel depends on the integrity of the edges of the film - if you have buckled edges it is difficult to ensure that each part of the film is in a separate part of the reel's spiral.

    I would recommend re-fixing and re-washing the damaged portion. That will remove any undeveloped emulsion.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  3. #3
    sly
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    Looks like the film was misloaded, and this portion was touching another. Happens easily once a film is mangled or buckled. Part of the learning curve. We've all done it....

  4. #4
    Truzi's Avatar
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    It does look like the film was touching another part of the roll, and chemicals couldn't get to it.
    I did something similar my first time loading film (no one told me how to load a stainless reel, so I tried to push it through). That is why I went to plastic reels with their ratcheting method of loading - though I now prefer stainless.
    Truzi

  5. #5

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    Thanks
    I thought I got the hang of loading an SS reel, though I'm not sure if this happened BECAUSE of the buckling from the earlier attempt of putting it on plastic

  6. #6
    Trask's Avatar
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    Heaven save us from ratcheting plastic reels -- the only thing worse are old "apron" tanks that wind up leaving rub marks on the negatives. I suggest you stick with solid reels, as apparently you've begun to do. Sacrifice an old unused roll of film and practice loading until you can do it quickly and without error -- give you hands something to do while you're watching the tube!

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trask View Post
    Heaven save us from ratcheting plastic reels -- the only thing worse are old "apron" tanks that wind up leaving rub marks on the negatives. I suggest you stick with solid reels, as apparently you've begun to do. Sacrifice an old unused roll of film and practice loading until you can do it quickly and without error -- give you hands something to do while you're watching the tube!
    No need to be dramatic about it. Ratcheting reels are much easier for some people to use, especially beginners. I also prefer them over stainless reels, and I have done tons of developing. The one thing one has to watch out for is that the reel and film are both perfectly dry and clean. I work carefully with my films, making sure not to force anything, and I never have any problems with either loading or development. In any case, I can't imagine loading flimsy, curly film like Foma into a stainless reel. It would drive me nuts.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trask View Post
    Heaven save us from ratcheting plastic reels -- the only thing worse are old "apron" tanks that wind up leaving rub marks on the negatives. I suggest you stick with solid reels, as apparently you've begun to do. Sacrifice an old unused roll of film and practice loading until you can do it quickly and without error -- give you hands something to do while you're watching the tube!
    I must say I disagree strongly with the above, in fact heaven save us from SS reels, the only problems I have ever had, and the only films I have ever ruined with loading problems, are with SS reels, I very quickly gave up on them and went back to my lovely Patterson reels, the trick with them is very simple, just run a pencil around the groves of any plastic reels and the film slips in ,

  9. #9

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    I recently switched to stainless and am still having trouble loading 35mm. However, I would never go back to plastic for 120.
    “You seek escape from pain. We seek the achievement of happiness. You exist for the sake of avoiding punishment. We exist for the sake of earning rewards. Threats will not make us function; fear is not our incentive. It is not death that we wish to avoid, but life that we wish to live.” - John Galt

  10. #10

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    I'm having a 50% hit rate with plastic. Once aligned, 35mm on SS goes right on.
    Should scrub them down with a toothbrush
    Not sure if its the way I cut the tip of the leader (I cut straight across and then clip the corners near a perf). I've made the leader too pointy before and it catches on the surrounding film.

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