Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,902   Posts: 1,521,137   Online: 1053
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15
  1. #1
    micwag2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Eastern Pennsylvania
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    173
    Images
    1

    Developing expired T-Max 100 in D-76

    I have a few rolls of T-Max 100 that i would like to develop in D-76, because that's what i have on hand. Since i have never developed film that was expired this long (1999 i believe) is there any compensation or adjustment in developing time i should use? I ran the film through a Kodak Brownie Hawkeye Flash model if that makes a difference.

  2. #2
    Rudeofus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,554
    Images
    10
    Yes, you can expose and develop the film at ISO 25 or 50 to make up for fog and sensitivity loss from long storage. If you are into tinkering, you can add extra restrainer (e.g. one to five grams per liter of Potassium Bromide) to your developer.
    Trying to be the best of whatever I am, even if what I am is no good.

  3. #3
    Karl K's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,429
    Images
    5
    Depending on the temperature and humidity under which the film was stored, you may want to adjust either the development time and/or the concentration of D-76. The film is about 15 years old, so a rule of thumb would suggest a slightly higher concentration of D-76 (perhaps an increase of about 10% concentration) to combat loss of contrast/fog. I would develop the first roll with that higher concentration and observe the results before processing the remaining rolls. Bottom line: the way the film was stored over the last 15 years will, in the end, determine your course of action.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    florida
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,147
    Images
    2
    I developed a roll of T-Max 400 120 yesterday that I found in my closet ... I shot it Saturday at box speed and developed it in ID11 1:1 along with a roll of Delta 400. Both were exposed with a light orange filter under fairly contrasty light conditions. I arbitrarily cut the developing time 45 seconds from the suggested Delta 400 which meant that it was slightly longer than the T-Max time. Both rolls are well exposed and the negatives look fine. The Delta 400 was fresh and the T-Max expired 13 years ago. Neither was stored under refrigeration but our house is air conditioned. My guess is that no particular adjustment is necessary.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/

  5. #5
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    14,171
    Images
    289
    For what it's worth, if TMax 100 is stored properly (frozen) it will probably be just fine. I bought 50 rolls of 1996 expired TMax 100 a few years ago, and it worked just like new. But it had been frozen.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  6. #6
    Hatchetman's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    559
    Images
    6
    I would shoot/develop per normal instructions.

  7. #7
    Fixcinater's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    San Diego, CA, USA
    Shooter
    127 Format
    Posts
    857
    Images
    17
    I bought a bunch of 100 and 400 speed Tmax that was stored poorly, expired in 03 and developed as per normal in 1:1 D76. It worked fine but grain was worse than fresh/properly stored film would be. Not unusable, just more noticeable. In 120 it would not have been a problem, in 35mm it is now relegated to abstract landscape duty.

  8. #8
    micwag2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Eastern Pennsylvania
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    173
    Images
    1
    Thanks for the replies. This film was stored in a photographers dark room in the basement of his studio. I'm guessing 60°-70°F. I'll develop this in a day or two and we'll see how it turns out.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Castle Rock, CO, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,299
    Images
    58
    I have a 100ft of the same film, expired for about as long and stored about the same way, that I haven't gotten around to testing yet. This will be interesting.
    A politician is a man who will double cross that bridge when he comes to it.

    Oscar Levant

  10. #10
    micwag2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Eastern Pennsylvania
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    173
    Images
    1
    Here are a few of the pictures I developed. D-76 for the recommended time. All photos taken with a Kodak Brownie Hawkeye Flash model. Not bad considering how expired the film is and the age and condition of the camera. I picked up the Brownie for 50¢ USD.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	PumpkinTable.jpg 
Views:	23 
Size:	295.8 KB 
ID:	76316Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Harley.jpg 
Views:	25 
Size:	345.0 KB 
ID:	76317Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Church Statue.jpg 
Views:	25 
Size:	352.1 KB 
ID:	76318

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin