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  1. #1

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    Verichrome Pan how to?

    I just got a lot of some old brownies and one of them had roll of exposed (7 frames) Verichrome 116 film. Now, I dont know how long this thing has been sitting in there, but it still bears old Kodak Logo. I want to develop it, but I dont know if I should compensate for the age, note that it most likley has not been stored in cooled dry place. I want to use Rodinal since that is what I have on hand right now. Any suggestions as what developing time I could shoot for?
    Thank you

  2. #2

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    HC-110b works well on old Verichrome Pan. Keep the developer cool and follow the suggested times.

  3. #3
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Agree with Sepia, I wouldn't use Rodinal as it will not be good at subduing the fogging...

    HC-110(B) or Ilfsol 3 as developers...

    Is it Verichrome.... Or Verichrome PAN ... There is a huge difference....

    I would develop it for 5:30 in HC-110 (B) standard time would be 4:30 but with aging film that's already shot I would at least give it a little extra boost.

    I get that you want to use Rodinal, I usually have the same problem with wanting to use what's on hand, but if you really care about getting an image, you should use something that will subdue the fog.

    Good luck and share your results!
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  4. #4

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    I have Ilfosol 3, so I guess I could use that. What time would you recommend for Ilfosol? IT is Verichrome Pan.

  5. #5
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by krisb1981 View Post
    I have Ilfosol 3, so I guess I could use that. What time would you recommend for Ilfosol? IT is Verichrome Pan.
    Well I've only shot the Verichrome non-pan and used ilfsol 3, when I shot the pan I used HC-110(B)

    Also the film was UN-Shot and so I compensated for the age during shooting, and developed as normal.

    In your case it sounds like the images were shot YEARS ago, so there may be some latent image failure, that can't be compensated for, but I would suggest using the same time I did of 5:00 in Ilfsol 3 since you have it.

    And see what you get... It probably won't be printable, only scannable, but you never know good luck!
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  6. #6

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    I dont care about printing for this roll. I will just scan it. Thank you for your time.

  7. #7

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    Verichrome Pan's latent image retention is basically "forever". I've developed lost rolls of VP that were literally forgotten in the backs of kitchen drawers for 50 years of South Carolina temperature changes and gotten surprisingly good results - the film survived about as well as postcards from that era have. Even Rodinal works OK - this was shot c.1965 and forgotten until found and developed this past February. 1:50 Rodinal for... 11 minutes, I think.


  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by shashinzukuri View Post
    Verichrome Pan's latent image retention is basically "forever". I've developed lost rolls of VP that were literally forgotten in the backs of kitchen drawers for 50 years of South Carolina temperature changes and gotten surprisingly good results - the film survived about as well as postcards from that era have. Even Rodinal works OK - this was shot c.1965 and forgotten until found and developed this past February. 1:50 Rodinal for... 11 minutes, I think.

    Thank you for posting that wonderful picture. I remember growing up in those times. A different country for sure.

  9. #9
    rjbuzzclick's Avatar
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    I recently developed a roll of 116 Verichrome Pan for a friend. I see-sawed it through a tray of D-76 stock for the standard time of 7:00@68F plus another 10% or so. From the images I got it looks like the film was exposed in the late 1960's. The film was fairly fogged, but I was able to get five images off the roll and contact print them.
    Reid

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/rjbuzzclick/

    "If I had a nickel for every time I had to replace a camera battery, I'd be able to get the #@%&$ battery cover off!" -Me

  10. #10

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    As a general development strategy for "found film", I went with a suggestion I read online somewhere to use a low fog developer at high concentration, but low temperature; which led me to HC-110 at dilution A and a temperature which I try to get down to around 40F. To determine the best development time, I have always performed a clip test similar to what is described here. So far with about a dozen developments under my belt (including three rolls of Verichrome Pan), I have to say that I have been rather pleased with the results.

    When it comes to the clip test my method is actually a bit more complicated than described on that site, and frankly is rather tedious. But the interesting thing is that the resulting times are pretty much right in line with the original Kodak recommendations! At least once the dilution and temperature are factored in. For Verichrome Pan, Kodak recommended a time of 6 minutes in HC-110(B) at 65F, which according to my calculation works out to about 9-1/4 minutes at dilution A and 40F. For comparison, one of my clip tests resulted in a time of about 9-1/2 minutes - so pretty much the same! I will have to do more tests to see if the trend holds, but so far I am not finding it necessary to add extra development time as is sometimes recommended.

    Here are a couple samples (first was from a Kodak Monitor, second from an Imperial Reflex 620):

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    Last edited by Denverdad; 12-05-2013 at 01:38 AM. Click to view previous post history.

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