Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,821   Posts: 1,581,877   Online: 1111
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    207

    What film was used in "Dali Atomicus"?

    Dali Atomicus is the famous 1948 picture of Dali and cats and water by Philippe Halsman
    http://www.shootingfilm.net/2013/04/...was-taken.html

    According to this interview with National Geographic Society photographer Chris Rainier, Halsman used Tri-X film:
    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/s...toryId=4583051

    But according to Kodak, Tri-X wasn't invented until 1954!
    http://www.kodak.com/ek/US/en/Our_Co.../1930-1959.htm

    and of course Tri-X TX400 is not available in sheet form (currently).

    So what did Halsman use?

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Cheshire UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,909
    He probably used H Purr 3

    Simon ILFORD Photo / HARMAN technology Limited

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    337
    Furry Pussy 4

  4. #4
    markbarendt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Beaverton, OR, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,796
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    19
    Good answer Simon.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    207
    Such funny people. Please do not quit your day jobs.

    Well, what do you know, apparently Wikipedia knows more than Kodak. I guess the Kodak history page only talks about roll film history:

    "...Introduced around 1940 in sheets rated at ASA daylight 200 and tungsten 160, it was one of Kodak's first high-speed (for the time) black-and-white films. Tri-X was released in 35mm and 120 in 1954."

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,619
    Seems rather like worrying whether Turner bought his paints from Winsor & Newton or Rowney.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Lower Earth
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,251
    Blog Entries
    2
    Images
    31
    He bought them from Sam's Discount Paints I think. I have plenty more folks. I'll be here all week, and I don't have a day job to quit. Tried that, did not like it.

    That first link, if you go to the links on the right, there's some wonderful stuff there! Especially the one of the guys photographing the bird nest.
    Last edited by momus; 12-16-2013 at 12:55 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    NYC
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,188
    Dali bought his paints from either Pearl Paint or Utrecht Linen in NYC.

    The popular films before the war were kodak verichromne and ansco although agfa and dupont were heavy contenders.

    I'll bet on big yellow, Kodak Verachrome safety film!
    Anyone can make a Digital print, but only a photographer can make a photograph.

  9. #9
    Jim Noel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,904
    Blog Entries
    1
    Most likely he used Kodak Super XX, or Super Panchro Press. The latter was more favored with flash.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Los Alamos, NM
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,075
    There was a sheet film version of Tri-X available before 1954. It wasn't very common. Alternatively, he may have used Super-XX (common in the studio) of Super Panchro Press Type B (a common press film of the era, high speed, grainy - Weegee used it a lot). My guess is either Tri-X or Super-XX, because it is a pretty smooth image, as I recall. Tri-X of the era would be significantly grainier than Super-XX. The shot was made with EG&G strobes, which didn't put out the light that modern strobe lighting does. Although he had quite a number of them, speed would have been important.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin