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  1. #1
    mfohl's Avatar
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    Help:D76 and Delta 400 Pro

    So I'm developing some film for a client. Two of the rolls are Delta 400 Pro, and two of them are FP5+. My developer of choice is D76, and I dilute it 1 to 1. I do all my own film that way, but my own film is almost always Tri-X. Then I consult the Massive Dev Chart. Delta 400 Pro in D76 1+1 rated at 400 says 14 minutes. FP5+, same info, says 13 minutes. So I cut a corner and developed all four rolls in the same tank for 13 1/2 minutes. The FP5+ came out fine. But both rolls of Delta 400 Pro are *really* dense. Very heavy base plus fog. I can see images, but they will probably be difficult to print.

    I also developed two rolls of Delta 100 Pro and one roll of Arista 400 according to Massive Dev, and they are fine.

    The film isn't mine, so I don't know its history. Any idea what's up?

    Thanks in advance,

    -- Mark

  2. #2
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    That's Ilford's recommended developing time also.

    http://www.ilfordphoto.com/download....8953322222.pdf

    If I were you I'd be curious and purchase a roll of HP5+ and Delta 400, make sure they're fresh, and shoot them at the same time and develop them together, just to make sure it wasn't something in your process. It might be worth your time to make sure, so you know for sure where responsibility lies.

    Good luck!
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  3. #3
    whlogan's Avatar
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    I presume you know about reducers? Framers Reducer may save the day for you. Check it out, but be very careful. One can over do it. A little goes a long way and good luck.
    Logan

  4. #4

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    I don't want to sound too 'picky', but it might be wiser to follow the manufacturers instructions rather than the Massive chart although in this case they are coincidentally very similar. Even better would be your own tests in your own developing environment, especially if you are doing this professionally - a clip test of a couple of your own rolls would only use a few exposures and would provide baseline for an unfamiliar material (same goes if they request an unfamiliar developer).

    Assuming that you did indeed dilute the stock and that temperature control was good, in this case you might be able to hope that the film was over-exposed, rather than over developed. It may be possible to explain this to the customer by showing that the density is overall higher, rather than just a big contrast increase. The high fog level might be more tricky.

    Offer to check his camera meter (or other metering method) with your own calibrated and in-date exposure meter - basically do everything to help him/her find the problem with their gear, if that is where it seems to be. Using a reducer may help the negs print more easily, but it would of course be better for customer relations to suggest this as a solution (pun intended) for the problem rather than just try it without discussion.

  5. #5

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    Something happened to the film before it was given to you for development. Delta 400 (120) has been my main film for may years and unless I want more or less contrast I develop for 14 min @ 68F with no pre-soak. During the past couple of weeks I developed 20 rolls shot at box speed and in D76 1:1 with absolutely no problems. Last night i developed two rolls in PMK Pyro for 20 min @ 70F and also got excellent results. For my 4x5 I use HP5 also at box speed and develop with D76 for 13 min @ 68F or PMK Pyro for 20-22 min @ 70F. The extra 30 sec+/- should not make very much difference since it it about 3.5-4%. Any difference that small could easily be compensated for in printing if was noticeable.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/

  6. #6
    BradS's Avatar
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    sounds like the film saw some improper storage temps....like it was left in the glove box of the car for a few days during summer.

  7. #7

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    The dev time sounds fine......we are immediately thinking ( posting ) of incorrect processing, you are getting ahead of yourselves...think first of incorrect exposure, I'm not saying its that, its just that is the 'first' and most likely thing.

    Not saying Mark did that, I would be surprised if he did, but he would not be the first or the last and I'm included in that number.. just when trying to identify any photographic issue where something does not turn out as you expect try and examine things in sequence.

    Simon ILFORD Photo / HARMAN technology Limited

  8. #8
    grommi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mfohl View Post
    Very heavy base plus fog.....The film isn't mine, so I don't know its history.
    Doesn't make think of wrong exposure but wrong storage. Long expired and stored too warm? Fast films are much more sensitive than slow ones and I try to use them as fresh as possible.



 

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