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Thread: Stop Baths

  1. #1

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    Stop Baths

    Almost all the years I have used the normal Acetic Acid stop bath for both Black and white (45) or colour printing. (24) One time I changed over to citric acid based stop bath and as usual used it as and when I did printing using my Nova Deep tanks. The one occasion I used the citric acid but didn't do any printing for about 2 weeks when I went to use it, the top of the stop bath slot was filled with mold. I have never had this with acetic acid bases SB.

    Has anyone else come across this before? The reason I am asking due to the acetic acid base causing me skin problems and want to change over to the citric based which I feel will be gentler and not cause me the problems I am having.

    Using plain water is not an option!

  2. #2

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    This has been observed and mentioned in a number of other threads as well. As I think you have already concluded, you are stuck with dumping citric acid stop more frequently due to the mould- forming characteristic if acetic is causing you a problem.

    If you have long periods between printing then the cheapest method might be to buy it as a powder( Silverprint sell it or get it in large quantities from home-brew suppliers) and make up a litre each time and then dump. 15g per litre is the figure I have seen mentioned but you might get away with less if it's a use and dump frequently routine

    It certainly doesn't smell as vinegary as acetic acid stop so the darkroom smells less like a fish and chip shop.

    pentaxuser

  3. #3
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    I always pour it back into a bottle, squeeze the air out just as if it were developer and cap. I never grow mold in working strength stuff but I did find it floating in years old bottles of concentrate I had when I got back into the darkroom. Had to dump that.

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    David Lyga's Avatar
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    You know, I think that the best thing to do for stop bath is to use the acetic acid but...at a higher dilution and with more frequent change (ie, 'one shot'). You eliminate the strong smell, you work with 'always fresh' solutions, you don't use any more of the concentrate (glacial).

    After film development flood the film with acetic acid stop bath at a 1%, or even 0.5%, strength. Your development WILL be stopped, immediately. For color film I use a couple (at least) of iterations so that the color developer is REALLY off the film (as I don't want ANY bleach to mix with developer residue). - David Lyga

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    Acetic acid acts as a preservative which is the reason why we pickle various foods. Bacteria and molds do not like it. But they view citric acid much as we do orange juice it is a food to them. You can slow down the mold growth by adding a small amount of classic Listerine to the bath. The thymol in the Listerine acts as a preservative. Try 30 ml per liter of bath to start. it will have no effect on film or prints.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  6. #6
    Thomas.Goehler's Avatar
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    I simply use citric acid in powder form (2 tablespoons on 1 litre of water) from the drug store next door and dispose of it after the session. Nothing simpler, nothing cheaper.
    Canon FD &EF, Mamiya AF, Nikon, Pentax, Praktica, Minolta

  7. #7
    thefizz's Avatar
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    Citric acid stop is not recommended for colour printing.
    www.thephotoshop.ie
    www.monochromemeath.com

    "you get your mouth off of my finger" Les McLean

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    White vinegar 1+9 w/ water for 1 minute. Works for B&W, have no knowledge for colour. Really, anything mildly acidic will work, but if colour does not call for acid stop bath then you'll have to use something else. It smells, but so does the Kodak stop bath that I have. People say that stop bath is actually cheaper than vinegar, but not at the Dollar Store it isn't :] You have to figure in shipping too w/ stop bath prices.
    Last edited by momus; 01-02-2014 at 02:19 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #9
    Thomas.Goehler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by thefizz View Post
    Citric acid stop is not recommended for colour printing.
    I thought we were talking about B&W, at least this is the board for B&W.
    Canon FD &EF, Mamiya AF, Nikon, Pentax, Praktica, Minolta

  10. #10
    thefizz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas.Goehler View Post
    I thought we were talking about B&W, at least this is the board for B&W.
    mbikerider said he was using it for both B&W and colour.
    www.thephotoshop.ie
    www.monochromemeath.com

    "you get your mouth off of my finger" Les McLean

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