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  1. #21
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RattyMouse View Post
    I have only monitored the temperature of my pre-soak and developer. The acid stop bath, fixing agent, and washes are all done at room temp, probably 18 C or cooler.
    You can do everything at 18 C - including the developer.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  2. #22

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    The Ilford wash (5,10,20) is pretty brief and i think it's only suitable if you had a hypo clear stage. When I home develop I don't use hypo clear but I wash for a reasonably long time. I fill the tank with water and let it sit for about five minutes, them pour out, refill and repeat. I do about 6 or 7 of these so the wash time ends up around 30 to 40 minutes. I don't get any pink tinges in the film base after this. I seem to recall this wash method was suggested by Photo Engineer as one that was recommended by Kodak. As the film sits in the still water the fix and dyes resorb out into the water and are then poured down the sink, so you don't require running water or constant agitation.

  3. #23
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    It's important to maintain consistent temps during all steps of your developing process. In my area the water from the tap is between 63 - 70 F, which usually matches the ambient temperature of my bottled chemicals. I just adjust my development times based on the developer temp, and wash longer if the rinse water is colder. Some recommend using hot/cold water baths to regulate the temps of your chemicals before pouring them in the tank.

    The anti-halation dye added to many films is what you see when you pour out the pre-wash water. I usually follow the manufacturer's recommendation as to whether to use a pre-wash before developer. After drying, a slight purple tint is not unusual for many films, but Kodak films seem to be more prone to this. I've never found this to cause any problems when printing my negatives. Lengthen fixing times as you process more rolls, keep track of how much film has gone thru that fixer and use Hypo Clearing agent. It's better to fix your film longer than the recommended time (within reason) than to fix for too short a time. I also wash longer than recommended, at least 10 to 20 mins.

    If you're new to developing film, maintain a consistent process and follow the manufacturer's recommendations. It also helps to stick to the same film/developer combinations until you learn what results to expect.

  4. #24
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    The magenta cast you (and many others) see in Tri-X is the same as the one that was frequently reported with TMAX films. It comes from a sensitizer dye, i.e. an embedded dye that makes sure that the silver halide in the film responds to visible light, not only UV light. This dye sticks well to silver halide, so as long as you have remains of unfixed silver in your film the dye won't wash out. In order to get rid of this dye, you need a strong, fresh fixer and a good washing cycle. If you already have such a purple film strip, you can always refix and rewash until the color cast is gone.
    Trying to be the best of whatever I am, even if what I am is no good.

  5. #25
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    a) the purple really doesn't matter for any purpose whatsoever, unless you're under-fixing (really bad) or under-washing (bad)
    b) the Ilford wash method (which they advocate as a water-saving measure, it's the bare minimum) is borderline and while it's OK for Ilford films, some Kodak films take a bit more washing.
    c) you don't need washaid (hypo clear) for film, because the emulsion is so thin. It's for getting fixer out of fibre paper, which soaks the stuff up like a sponge - it's literally 100x harder to get fixer out of FB paper than film
    d) make sure you use rapid fixer, and give the film a good 5 minutes (8 minutes for T-grain films: Tmax, Acros, Delta) in there with plenty of agitation

    Try washing for about 10 minutes, with at least 5-6 changes of water and agitation for at least half that time. The purple will disappear entirely. A 10 minute wash with 6 changes of water and constant agitation will give perfectly clear negatives. A Jobo or any other motorised roller base is hugely helpful for fixing and washing to completion

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by RattyMouse View Post
    I just finished up with my second developing of my own film. Still Kodak Tri-X in D-76, 1:1. This time I did a pre-soak stage, soaking the film in 20 C water for 3 mins. No agitation here, just soaking.

    After developing, stopping, fixing, and then washing, I find that my film still has the purple color to it. The negatives look great otherwise.

    I know that this is not a serious flaw, yet I still want to improve and get my negatives as clear as when they come back from a pro lab.

    What else can I do to clear away this purple color? Should I agitate during the pre-soak? Should I do more than one pre-soak?

    Finally, I'm told that these purple negatives will print well, but will they scan well too? I need to send my negatives out for scanning and I dont know if this purple color will confuse them.

    Thanks!
    Hi RM,

    The key to successfully employing the Ilford film washing sequence is getting residual chemical out of your tank and the key to getting rid of all traces of the purple dye is to use a two-stage fixing sequence with fresh fixer and an intermediate wash of the film.

    The following sequence is what I use and also teach during workshops. Neither I nor any of the people that I have taught have any problems with residual purple dye. Just for clarification, I have always used Paterson plastic developing tanks.
    • Pour out the water stop-bath
    • Pour in a rapid fixer (I use Ilford Hypam or equivalent at 1 + 4) and fix with constant agitation for 2 minutes.
    • Remove film from tank (keep on the spirals) and place in large jug of water and agitate constantly (changing the water every two minutes) until the majority of the pink dye has been removed (usually, with constant agitation, this takes two changes of water)
    • Replace the film in tank with fixer and fix for a further 2 minutes with agitation every 30 seconds.
    • Remove film and place in a large jug with plain water.
    • Empty fix out of tank.
    • Wash all parts of the tank thoroughly and then fill with plain water.
    • Place film back into the tank, secure lid and invert 10 times.
    • Empty water and refill with plain water and invert 10 times.
    • Empty water and refill with plain water and invert 20 times.
    • Empty water and refill with plain water and invert 20 times.
    • Remove film from tank and place in a large jug filled with distilled water and a few drops of wetting agent.
    • Leave film for a minimum of 3 minutes.
    • Remove film from reel and (with a bucket underneath) pour the contents of the jug down both sides of the film.
    • Hang to dry with no squegeeing or fingers on film.


    By the way, I also use a two minute presoak irrespective of the developer in question.

    Hope this helps and let us know if you achieve nice clean negatives without any trace of the pink dye.

    Bests,

    David
    www.dsallen.de

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by polyglot View Post
    a) the purple really doesn't matter for any purpose whatsoever, unless you're under-fixing (really bad) or under-washing (bad)
    b) the Ilford wash method (which they advocate as a water-saving measure, it's the bare minimum) is borderline and while it's OK for Ilford films, some Kodak films take a bit more washing.
    c) you don't need washaid (hypo clear) for film, because the emulsion is so thin. It's for getting fixer out of fibre paper, which soaks the stuff up like a sponge - it's literally 100x harder to get fixer out of FB paper than film
    d) make sure you use rapid fixer, and give the film a good 5 minutes (8 minutes for T-grain films: Tmax, Acros, Delta) in there with plenty of agitation

    Try washing for about 10 minutes, with at least 5-6 changes of water and agitation for at least half that time. The purple will disappear entirely. A 10 minute wash with 6 changes of water and constant agitation will give perfectly clear negatives. A Jobo or any other motorised roller base is hugely helpful for fixing and washing to completion
    Hi Polyglot. I am following YOUR instructions that are in your sig file!

    Do you know if Kodafix 200 is a rapid fix? I have a fresh dilution with only 2 rolls of film through it. I am fixing for 1 minute longer than your directions call for. I would guess that this is OK, except I am not doing this with temperature controlled fixer. I dont know what temp it was, but my house is rather cool. It could be lower than 18 C, maybe 16 C. It is stored in an unheated bathroom.

    I am going to wash the hell out of my film tomorrow, just to observe the difference.
    Last edited by RattyMouse; 01-04-2014 at 07:39 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #28

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    David,

    Thank you for your procedure. I currently have very limited space and even more limited containers. But once I am more set up, I will keep your suggestions in mind.

    Thanks again!

  9. #29
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    RM, it is always best to err on the side of over.fixing. but not by too much. An extra minute will not hurt. I have always rinse 5-10-20 and never had a problem. Of course, my rinse always approaches 20C so I have never rinsed with much colder water. Rather than washing more or adding steps, change only one thing at a time. That way if it works you know of a certainty what fixed the problem. My vote, control your temp as best you can throughout.

  10. #30
    RPC
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    RattyMouse, the color cast will certainly take longer to go away at the temperatures you process at. You can either fix and wash longer or warm the fixer and wash water several degrees. This will also ensure you have complete fixation and washing.

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