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  1. #31
    BradS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom1956 View Post
    They don't use D-76 in those big machines. They use harsher chemistry. Frankly I can't explain the lingering purple of home-developed film, but I've almost always had it. The only thing I've learned from my years is that the pre-wash water always pours out dark, and developer does not, if I don't pre-wash. So that means either the development "sets the stain", or there's some kind of chemical reaction going on. But the fact remains that the pre-wash water pour out nasty and dark, an the film comes out less purple. After that, don't worry about it. I think it fades a little in time. Always more purple when fresh out of the tank, wet.
    You don't have a problem, you did just fine.
    Yes, there is some kinda of chemical reaction going on is correct. The Sodium Sulfite in the developer (and in the Hypo clearing agent too) bleaches out the color.

    As Tom and others have said, don't worry about the purple tint. It is normal. The purple can be washed out with more time in the final wash and washing in warmer water. Using a hypo clearing agent step will also help.

    I use tap water at about 30 degrees C during the wash phase. You can do this with modern high quality films from Kodak, Ilford and Fuji. I would not do it however with Efke.
    Last edited by BradS; 01-04-2014 at 10:53 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #32

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    I've found that using the two-bath method for fixing film gets rid of the purple cast pretty much completely without having to wash for extended times. I don't use hypo in the wash either. I use Ilford Rapid Fixer.

  3. #33
    BradS's Avatar
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    try this for fun:

    1) mix up some hypo clearing agent or, simply dissolve 100g of sodium sulfite in a liter of water.
    2) pour some red wine in a glass
    3) slowly add hypo clearing agent or sodium sulfite solution to the glass of wine
    4) see what happens to the color.

  4. #34
    Terry Christian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by limsoonchung View Post
    I've found that using the two-bath method for fixing film gets rid of the purple cast pretty much completely without having to wash for extended times. I don't use hypo in the wash either. I use Ilford Rapid Fixer.
    I may be nitpicking the language here, but I feel it's important for the children: HYPO = FIXER. HYPO-CLEAR is wash-aid, a substance that helps to CLEAR the HYPO from the film (or, when printing, paper).

    PLEASE do not call hypo-clear "hypo"! Hypo is another name for fixer -- sodium thiosulfate, which was previously called hyposulfite of soda.

    So, you pre-wash (optional); develop; stop; fix (one-bath or two-bath, your choice); hypo-clear/wash-aid (optional); wash; final rinse with Kodak Photo-Flo/Edwal LFN/other rinse aid.

    Again, I apologize if I come across too harsh, but I don't want any newcomers to ruin their film by confusing two completely different chemicals.

  5. #35

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    Point well taken. No need to apologise. Always better to be precise.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by RattyMouse View Post
    I just finished up with my second developing of my own film. Still Kodak Tri-X in D-76, 1:1. This time I did a pre-soak stage, soaking the film in 20 C water for 3 mins. No agitation here, just soaking.

    After developing, stopping, fixing, and then washing, I find that my film still has the purple color to it. The negatives look great otherwise.

    I know that this is not a serious flaw, yet I still want to improve and get my negatives as clear as when they come back from a pro lab.

    What else can I do to clear away this purple color? Should I agitate during the pre-soak? Should I do more than one pre-soak?

    Finally, I'm told that these purple negatives will print well, but will they scan well too? I need to send my negatives out for scanning and I dont know if this purple color will confuse them.

    Thanks!
    first oall, consider this a cosmetic flaw. it's what's left of the antihalation layer of the film and has no negative effect on picture quality. If it still bothers you,the good news is it's water soluable.I use the two-bath fixing method followed by 2min wash aid and a 10 min wash and get no purple tint ever.in oother words, a good fix and a longer wet time after fix will get rid of it. I also heard that exposure to near UV will eliminate the purple. so a couple of days in a north -ponting window should do the trick, but I haven't tested that.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  7. #37

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    This works for me: I fix with TF-4 fixer and then I rinse for about 5-7 minutes in 90-100 degree F water. Clear as day - no purple.

  8. #38

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    I haven't ever developed Tri-X but have developed TMax 400 and I needed about 4 sequences of pre-wash with occasional agitation and dump to rid the film of almost all the dye but looking at the posts for some commonality I'd hazard a guess that D Allen's process of double fix and overall a similar amount of washing as my pre-soak and dumps would be even better.

    Incidentally while I do not wish to dissuade you from continuing with trad B&W film, I'd suggest that if you are stuck with scanning for the foreseeable future you might want to consider XP2+. It is said to be easier to scan and yet retains excellent darkroom printing qualities.

    Of course it requires the C41 process which has the added potential difficulty of retaining a higher temperature of 37.8 if you want to develop it yourself but does have the advantage of being able to be processed in any mini-lab, not many of which are geared up to trad B&W film development.

    pentaxuser

  9. #39

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    I process T-Max 400 very frequently and wash for 10 minutes in running water with no purple tinting, assuming fresh fixer. Do not overuse the fix. Mixing fresh fixer every session isn't such a bad idea. Suggest 4 to 6 films per litre of rapid fix at 1+4 dilution (5 minutes continuous agitation, 20ºC).

    Tom

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by RattyMouse View Post
    Hi Polyglot. I am following YOUR instructions that are in your sig file!

    Do you know if Kodafix 200 is a rapid fix? I have a fresh dilution with only 2 rolls of film through it. I am fixing for 1 minute longer than your directions call for. I would guess that this is OK, except I am not doing this with temperature controlled fixer. I dont know what temp it was, but my house is rather cool. It could be lower than 18 C, maybe 16 C. It is stored in an unheated bathroom.

    I am going to wash the hell out of my film tomorrow, just to observe the difference.
    I've never used Kodafix 200 (my local shop has Ilford so I get the 5L bottles of Hypam) but a bit of googling tells me that:
    - Kodafix is (maybe) a rapid fixer: good
    - Kodafix is hardening: bad

    Use of hardening fixers makes washing times much, much longer because it makes the gelatin contract to a dense, hard state which is less permeable. It's possible that your film colouration is due to the presence of hardener slowing the wash process, in which case you're probably under-washing. A hypo clearing agent will help if you used a hardening fixer but should otherwise not be necessary for film.

    Your other thread indicated (oops, just read to the end of that thread). Also if Kodafix is NOT a rapid fixer as according to some posts in your thread, then you will need much much longer fixing times too. Like 10+ minutes.
    Last edited by polyglot; 01-04-2014 at 09:05 PM. Click to view previous post history.

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