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  1. #1

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    How to make flat film?

    Now that I have 3 rolls under my belt, I'm going to prepare and ship off my film for scanning. My films are not as flat as they could be and I fear that my resulting scans will be of poor quality due to that fact.

    What is the best procedure to make the negatives as flat as can be? I am taking my dry negatives, placing them in the plastic storage holder and then putting them under a book and then putting some weight on them (4 kg).

    I just started this so I'm unsure if this will be enough.

    Thanks for all the tips!

  2. #2
    BradS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RattyMouse View Post
    I am taking my dry negatives, placing them in the plastic storage holder and then putting them under a book and then putting some weight on them (4 kg).
    No. Do not do that. That would likely be a very bad thing. Just hang a clothes pin from the free end of the film when you hang the negs to dry.

  3. #3
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Check with your lab first - they may prefer uncut rolls for scanning.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by BradS View Post
    No. Do not do that. That would likely be a very bad thing. Just hang a clothes pin from the free end of the film when you hang the negs to dry.
    OK, I stopped that 5 mins after starting. Thanks.

    I do hang 3 pins at the bottom of the roll, but there is still a curl to the film along the vertical axis. That's the part I am trying to flatten out.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Check with your lab first - they may prefer uncut rolls for scanning.
    Dang! I didnt think of that. Already cut the rolls.

    How would you ship and store uncut film?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by RattyMouse View Post
    Dang! I didnt think of that. Already cut the rolls.

    How would you ship and store uncut film?
    http://photo.net/black-and-white-pho...g-forum/00S5sB
    www.vinnywalsh.com

    I know what I want but I just don't know how to go about gettin' it.-Hendrix

  7. #7

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    I reverse roll the film -- against the curl -- after it has dried, and let it sit a coupla days. This not only removes the curl along the long axis, but also the curl that you get in a dry climate when the emulsion shrinks a titch and pulls the edges up together -- utah is very dry and some films do this a lot.

    I end up with nice flat film that is easy to scan and print.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by summicron1 View Post
    I reverse roll the film -- against the curl -- after it has dried, and let it sit a coupla days. This not only removes the curl along the long axis, but also the curl that you get in a dry climate when the emulsion shrinks a titch and pulls the edges up together -- utah is very dry and some films do this a lot.

    I end up with nice flat film that is easy to scan and print.
    Interesting! Thanks for the suggestion.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by BradS View Post
    No. Do not do that. That would likely be a very bad thing
    Could you explain why you think it would be a bad thing?

  10. #10
    Regular Rod's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RattyMouse View Post
    Now that I have 3 rolls under my belt, I'm going to prepare and ship off my film for scanning. My films are not as flat as they could be and I fear that my resulting scans will be of poor quality due to that fact.

    What is the best procedure to make the negatives as flat as can be? I am taking my dry negatives, placing them in the plastic storage holder and then putting them under a book and then putting some weight on them (4 kg).

    I just started this so I'm unsure if this will be enough.

    Thanks for all the tips!
    The way you dry the films contributes to how curved the film will be and which way it will curve.

    Curled towards the emulsion = dried too warm
    Curled away from the emulsion = dried too cold

    Flat = you got it right.

    Spiralled up like a clock spring = nothing you can do, it's the manufacturer's fault. You can try hanging heavier weights on the film, whilst it is hung up to dry, but it is not by any means a complete cure..

    RR

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