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  1. #11

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    Silvering on a Tetenal branded RC print (probably made by Sterling, India) after beeing framed for 5 years. I've taken this snap in 2010 and need to pay a visit to a friend of mine who received this framed photo from me soon to see how the damage progressed: http://www.shrani.si/f/1l/wq/1YxiQBuv/p1110974.jpg (see shiny spots)

  2. #12

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    To protect your RC paper prints to the highest level of certainty currently available, make sure they are fixed and washed correctly then use Sistan in accordance with it's instructions. It might be available from other manufacturers these days (I just checked, it is now called AG-Stab) but that will do the job. Selenium toning has to be a total replacement of the silver to give complete protection, and that will change the image appearance.

  3. #13
    Rafal Lukawiecki's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fretlessdavis View Post
    Our well water is very hard (very tasty, though!) and I usually hypo-clear RC prints so I can wash in a small amount of distilled water. All the added washing of FB is difficult and pricey if I used distilled.
    Having somewhat hard water, though depending on what makes up its hardness, can help in washing FB prints. If the water is high in carbonate, you may want to compare the residual thiosulfate levels, after washing in your hard water, and after washing in distilled water. You may be pleasantly surprised to find no difference, and maybe even better results with your well water. On the other hand, if your well water is heavy with some other less helpful minerals or heavy metals, you could be worse off with it, but I suspect you wouldn't have found it so tasty.

    In any case, using a hypo clearing agent with FB should help no matter what water you use, being even more important when using distilled water.
    Rafal Lukawiecki
    See rafal.net | Read rafal.net/articles

  4. #14
    fretlessdavis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MartinP View Post
    To protect your RC paper prints to the highest level of certainty currently available, make sure they are fixed and washed correctly then use Sistan in accordance with it's instructions. It might be available from other manufacturers these days (I just checked, it is now called AG-Stab) but that will do the job. Selenium toning has to be a total replacement of the silver to give complete protection, and that will change the image appearance.
    Dumb question, but is this stuff OK/recommended for use on negatives? I'm about out of PhotoFlo and noticed it has a wetting agent included... I'm tight on space to the fewer the bottles of concentrate I have laying around the better.
    New-ish convert to film.
    Pentax MX for 35mm
    Bronica ETRS for 645

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by miha View Post
    John, there is no more logo on the back since Kodak quit making BW paper.
    thanks,
    its been a while since i bought any ..
    all mine is expired about 10 years or so ...


    Quote Originally Posted by timor View Post
    I think the bad opinion about RC papers also comes from the fact, that many contain own developer.

    there are plenty of fiber prints that haven't stood the test of time
    and they had no incorporated developer
    Last edited by jnanian; 01-05-2014 at 12:10 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #16
    fretlessdavis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rafal Lukawiecki View Post
    Having somewhat hard water, though depending on what makes up its hardness, can help in washing FB prints. If the water is high in carbonate, you may want to compare the residual thiosulfate levels, after washing in your hard water, and after washing in distilled water. You may be pleasantly surprised to find no difference, and maybe even better results with your well water. On the other hand, if your well water is heavy with some other less helpful minerals or heavy metals, you could be worse off with it, but I suspect you wouldn't have found it so tasty.

    In any case, using a hypo clearing agent with FB should help no matter what water you use, being even more important when using distilled water.
    Good tip. We actually live at the base of the Whetstone mountains (home of the famed Kartchner Caverns and likely many other caves.) So it is very likely that our water is quite high in carbonate. I never thought about it before, and just associated our water with horrible spotting on prints, and have been afraid to use it ever since. Maybe a wash in our well water with a final quick rinse in water with a wetting agent would work.

    A small pack of FB paper and some more hypocheck will be on its way shortly!
    New-ish convert to film.
    Pentax MX for 35mm
    Bronica ETRS for 645

  7. #17

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    If RC prints are processed to archival standards then they will certainly last a very long time indeed, In hesitate to say that they will last as long as FB prints simply because RC paper hasn't been around as long, but I started using RC paper almost as soon as it came out, I still have prints made on the very early paper and I can't see any loss of quality on either the very early Ilford or Kodak paper, so I have no hesitation in printing for myself, for exhibition, sales or other on today's RC Paper, in fact I prefer to print on RC paper as I think I print better on it, many people prefer my prints made on RC, and mounted you have a very hard time telling the difference between RC or FB paper,

  8. #18
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by timor View Post
    I think the bad opinion about RC papers also comes from the fact, that many contain own developer.
    None of the current Ilford RC papers contain developer. Only the long discontinued rapid papers did.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  9. #19

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    As soon as RC hit, I almost never touched fiber paper again, except for one portfolio I assembled. I have prints from the dawn of RC, the early 1970s, that are still just fine--100% of them. There is some silvering in the oldest ones, and I gather that was one of the early problems that was worked out by the manufacturers. In later more commercial production work with RC papers I discovered on my own that fix that had been used too much could cause silvering to develop, and after using that was always careful to use fresh fixer and discard it early, after which I never had any silvering problems whatsoever. All of those prints, shot starting in 1985 and many of which I refer to daily (they are dry mounted to archival museum board, in binders) are still fine.

    I guess it's probably well-known, but I'll say it anyway, that excessive wet time causes the edges to curl up. Because I was doing hundreds of prints a day at that time, I have a lot of curled edges, but that's not the paper's fault.

  10. #20
    AgX
    AgX is online now

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    Possible causes for deterioration of PE-based prints in contrast to prints made on classic paper:

    -) the deterioration of plain PE due to UV-light

    -) un unwanted catalytic effect of the TiO2 within the PE on this

    -) the absence of a baryta-/paper-sink for forming and migrating salts


    This does not mean that it will happen, but these are the critical issues discussed in the past. There are preventive means against all three.

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