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  1. #21

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    May I clarify?

    Golly, I had no idea my blog would bring forth such interesting comments! I am flattered that you are all listening. I should, though, probably clarify my comments about the "half an hour" of darkroom work.
    For me, printing is a soul-searching and very intimate, creative act. I don't listen to music when I print. I don't allow anyone else in the room (dark or otherwise) and I work uninterrupted, often for hours. It is my experience that this works best for me. I need to be focussed, sensitive, and aware -- all of which are easily lost in a hubbub of noise and conversation. I guard and protect this private, creative space with, shall I say, "enthusiasm."
    However, when it comes to SPOTTING prints or even cutting mat boards, that is another story. I don't find these kinds of tasks meditative. I do find simply them grunt work. This is what I was doing before dinner -- spotting prints and then printing them to see if they were spotted cleanly or if the spotting work was visible. Sometimes I spot/print several cycles before a print is clean and I am satisfied. My aging eyes being what they are, I often find I have missed spots and need to go back at it again.
    As to "darkroom work" on the computer, I stand corrected. What is the correct term for doing computer stuff? Do we have a term yet? It isn't "studio work" -- that implies making photographs under artificial light. I am not fond of "digital darkroom" because it's too clunky and even confusing -- besides the movements and actions are so different between the two activites. Photoshopping? Sounds like a trip to the mall. Image futzing? Yuck. So . . . please pardon the use of the term "darkroom." I didn't mean to offend folks who are traditional darkroom printers. I just don't what else to call it yet.
    Brooks Jensen
    Editor, LensWork Publishing
    Written Tuesday, February 8, 2005 at 7:13 PM.

  2. #22
    James Bleifus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lenswork
    ] So . . . please pardon the use of the term "darkroom." I didn't mean to offend folks who are traditional darkroom printers. I just don't what else to call it yet.
    Brooks Jensen
    Editor, LensWork Publishing
    Written Tuesday, February 8, 2005 at 7:13 PM.
    Brooks, I don't feel you owe anyone an apology. I listen to your blogs because they provoke thought. This one was no exception and that's why I value it.

    Cheers,

    James

  3. #23
    Aggie's Avatar
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    maybe this is a good opportunity to give the digital workflow a name that delinates it from traditional darkroom work.

    photo-computing
    lightroom photography
    digital computing
    compugraphy
    Non Digital Diva

  4. #24
    SchwinnParamount's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lenswork
    Golly, I had no idea my blog would bring forth such interesting comments! I am flattered that you are all listening. I should, though, probably clarify my comments about the "half an hour" of darkroom work.
    I look forward to each new blog you record. It makes a sometimes dull day at work a whole lot better. You always have interesting and thought provoking comments and I usually learn something from you. In fact, I've been meaning to take a trip into King county and across to Bainbridge Island where you are (I believe) to visit your gallery and poke my head in your office to say Hi. I've been buying Lenswork at Borders for a year now and love it.

    Regarding my comment about you slipping a notch. You attained "You da Man!" status early last year and prior to explaining your last blog, about to slip to "You just da man sitting next to da man" status. I've no idea who HE might be. At any rate, you're back to "da Man!" status. Keep it up and stay away from that dang computer.

    If you want APUG'ers being the creative people we are, will come up with a term for what you were doing in front of the computer before dinner the other night

  5. #25
    JeffD's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lenswork
    However, when it comes to SPOTTING prints or even cutting mat boards, that is another story. I don't find these kinds of tasks meditative. I do find simply them grunt work. This is what I was doing before dinner -- spotting prints and then printing them to see if they were spotted cleanly or if the spotting work was visible. Sometimes I spot/print several cycles before a print is clean and I am satisfied. My aging eyes being what they are, I often find I have missed spots and need to go back at it again.

    For me, it is not very "meditative" to try and flatten a negative for scanning without getting moire patterns, try to get a decent scan that is sharp, then always having to introduce artificial sharpening tools to make it so, go through hell trying to make the screen tones duplicate on paper, fret over ink splotches on digital prints, clean the heads dozens of times to try and get a clean print, failing, then having to calibrate and recalibrate the ink jet heads, make a huge mess changing cartridges, bang my head trying to figure out why horizontle micro lines appear on the print, get annoyed with a drab non glossy digital print, try glossy paper only to get extreme bronzing, repeat daily, etc. etc.

    I do find it meditative to bring down a 12 pound sledge hammer on my inkjet printer, and watch the tiny bits of worthless plastic shower down around me in a fascinating display...

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by JeffD

    I do find it meditative to bring down a 12 pound sledge hammer on my inkjet printer, and watch the tiny bits of worthless plastic shower down around me in a fascinating display...
    :o
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  7. #27

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    My problem with Lenswork.

    Perhaps some of us traditional people get a little highspirited when given the opportunity to beat the digital wolf from the door, Brooks.

    My problem with Lenswork is that it never seems to arrive fast enough.



    (er perhaps I might clarify; that wasn't a dig about the last issue.)
    Last edited by John McCallum; 02-09-2005 at 08:15 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #28
    roteague's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by John McCallum
    Perhaps some of us traditional people get a little highspirited when given the opportunity to beat the digital wolf from the door, Brooks.
    I can't complain about the quality of LensWork, although it is late getting here as well.

    FWIW, I just wrote an email to the editor of "Outdoor Photography" asking if they are ever going to bother writing about the new Nikon F6 or if they are going to continue ignoring it. It will be interesting to see if I get a response. Note: I see the upcoming issue of this digital rag will have an article on Ansel Adams.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  9. #29
    kwmullet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lenswork
    Golly, I had no idea my blog would bring forth such interesting comments! I am flattered that you are all listening. I should, though, probably clarify my comments about the "half an hour" of darkroom work.[...]

    Hey Brooks, et al.,

    One of the reasons I got out of IT was the disconnectedness of being in front of a computer all the time. It lacked for more substantive human contact, even if much of the time on the computer was spent in various forms of correspondence with other humans. One of the great things about APUG and lenswork are the things that go a long way toward devirtualization of the forum. With APUG, it's print and postcard exchanges, chat rooms and localized meetups to engage in real-world exchanges with the folks on the other side of the computer screen and keyboard.

    Your asynchronous audio blogs have had a similar effect on how I regard lenswork. I hope you remain a physical magazine and never sacrifice the physical presence for the virtual one, as at least one other magazine does by putting special "subscriber only" parts of the magazine on their website.

    Regarding connundrum of what to call expressive image time at the computer, I've heard it called "post-production", but that doesn't really fit, does it? It's not as if all the "production" in an expressive image stops at the moment when the shutter snaps closed. Hopefully, you're still producing right up until the time when your print (transparency, photoemulsion-covered coffee mug, whatever) finds its home. I would shy away from saying that wet darkroom time is "real" photographic printing and computer output isn't. For years and years, I've heard snobs from one discipline or another claim "School isn't real, just wait until you get to the real world", "The Navy isn't real -- wait until you get to the real world" or "working in academia isn't real...". You get the idea. I've long since concluded that everything is as real as everything else.

    Photography is, after all, an expressive conveyance of a given point of view through technochemical means. It's all an analog to something else. I'm not about to promote changing the site name, but even electronic photographic images are an analog to something. The world is neither black and white, grainular or two-dimensional. Hell, it doesn't even really have colors.

    I personally don't like digital capture much anymore, so I prefer "quiet" or "simpler" photography or "wet" printing to electronic capture or computer printing. In my opinion, though, it's all "real".

    Maybe, in the end, "darkroom time" isn't such a miss after all. When expressing yourself through an image, we all spend time in the dark, quiet room behind our own eyes.

    -KwM-


  10. #30
    roteague's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by roteague
    of "Outdoor Photography"
    Should be "Outdoor Photographer". Sorry. The other is a UK magazine, of much higher quality, IMO.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

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