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  1. #1
    akfotog's Avatar
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    KODAK POLYCONTRAST III RC GLOSSY

    Planning on printing on some expired Kodak Polycontrast III RC Glossy. I'm using Dektol, and Kodak's specification guide says to use a 1:9 ratio. I have always used Ilford Multigrades before, but my ratio has always been 1:3 in Dektol, should I follow Kodak's recommendation or use my 1:3 keeping a closer eye on the print development?
    akfotog


    Seneca/National 8x10, Cambo SCX 4x5, Tachihara Wood Field 4x5, Busch Pressman 4x5, Mamiya RB67 Pro SD, Hasselblad 500 C/M, Mamiya M645 1000S, Nikon F5, Nikon F100, Nikon F4S, Nikon FM2 Chrome.

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    It should be OK at 1:3.

    I would do a test for fog/Mottle. Take an unexposed sheet and cut it in half. Put one piece directly in the fixer, and the other for 1 1/2 minutes in the developer and then fix. Compare the two to see the level of fog.
    Dave

    "She's always out making pictures, She's always out making scenes.
    She's always out the window, When it comes to making Dreams.

    It's all mixed up, It's all mixed up, It's all mixed up."

    From It's All Mixed Up by The Cars

  3. #3
    akfotog's Avatar
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    Will try that mopar-guy, thanks.
    akfotog


    Seneca/National 8x10, Cambo SCX 4x5, Tachihara Wood Field 4x5, Busch Pressman 4x5, Mamiya RB67 Pro SD, Hasselblad 500 C/M, Mamiya M645 1000S, Nikon F5, Nikon F100, Nikon F4S, Nikon FM2 Chrome.

  4. #4

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    This old paper is likely to have fog and lowered contrast. Recommendations:
    - Use a high contrast developer
    o Dektol undiluted (your suggested 1:3 goes in the wrong direction)
    o Dokumol (Tetenal)
    o mix-your-own following Ilford ID-14 (google...)
    - Add benzotriazole @ 0.3g/liter working strength developer to fight fog and improve highlight "snap". Note: the image will be slower to appear, and you may need to extend total development time, although undiluted Dektol should be rather fast.
    http://stores.photoformulary.com/-st...ole/Detail.bok
    10g @ $4.95 will last you a lifetime
    - Selenium tone (1:10). Will increase Dmax and dark tones "snap". Also nice in general with any paper.

    Sucess is not guaranteed, but that is you best chance. If you have a fairly large quantity of expired paper, may be worth the effort.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by akfotog View Post
    Planning on printing on some expired Kodak Polycontrast III RC Glossy. I'm using Dektol, and Kodak's specification guide says to use a 1:9 ratio.
    This didn't sound right, so I dug up my copy of Kodak data sheet G-21 for Polycontrast III RC. The 1+9 recommendation is for Dektol liquid concentrate, which is a product I've never seen in the US and which I'm not sure even exists any more. For the more familiar Dektol mixed from powder, the recommendation is the usual 1+2.

    That said, if my experience with Kodak paper is any guide, you're likely to have a fog/contrast problem and may need to try the approaches already suggested.

  6. #6
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oren Grad View Post
    This didn't sound right, so I dug up my copy of Kodak data sheet G-21 for Polycontrast III RC. The 1+9 recommendation is for Dektol liquid concentrate, which is a product I've never seen in the US and which I'm not sure even exists any more. For the more familiar Dektol mixed from powder, the recommendation is the usual 1+2.

    That said, if my experience with Kodak paper is any guide, you're likely to have a fog/contrast problem and may need to try the approaches already suggested.
    The print developer branded as "Polymax T" in North America is branded as "Liquid Dektol" in some other parts of the world.

    I am also not sure whether or not Polymax T/Liquid Dektol is still in production, but I know that it is my go-to print developer at the present time (I have inventory).
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    The print developer branded as "Polymax T" in North America is branded as "Liquid Dektol" in some other parts of the world.

    I am also not sure whether or not Polymax T/Liquid Dektol is still in production, but I know that it is my go-to print developer at the present time (I have inventory).
    Interesting, thanks - I never made the connection. Polymax T seems to be still readily available, so you should be in good shape for quite a while to come.

  8. #8
    Photo-gear's Avatar
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    I got hold of this kind of paper and, all along of the 50 sheet pack, I used the same formula: Dektol 1:2.

    As bernard_L said, this papier is a little foggy after the expiration time, although this side effect did not happen on every sheet. Kind of strange. On the other hand, I found the contrast quite acceptable.

    I also noticed that the paper turns into B&W very quickly, much quickly than any Ilford papers.

    Here a sample of a scanned print:
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/2959028...otolist-cGY1JL

    .

  9. #9
    akfotog's Avatar
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    Thanks for info all. Looks like I'll be spending a lot of time test-printing.
    akfotog


    Seneca/National 8x10, Cambo SCX 4x5, Tachihara Wood Field 4x5, Busch Pressman 4x5, Mamiya RB67 Pro SD, Hasselblad 500 C/M, Mamiya M645 1000S, Nikon F5, Nikon F100, Nikon F4S, Nikon FM2 Chrome.

  10. #10

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    for Akfotog

    Quote Originally Posted by akfotog View Post
    Thanks for info all. Looks like I'll be spending a lot of time test-printing.
    Hi Akfotog,

    I wonder what results you got if you already printed on this paper. I just got myself a pack of the same paper and wondering how yours turned out. What did you learn ? and what developer did you end up using ?
    my pack is expired 2006 . it seems like it may have been refrigerated in the past, but fridge was not working when I bought it (who knows how long) from this soon to be out of business shop.

    thanks

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