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  1. #11

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    Xmas:

    1) D-23 is not a low contrast developer and is not like POTA at all

    2) D-23 was formulated by Henn to essentially be a substitute for D-76. The working characteristics are very close. D-23 is said to give slightly finer grain with slightly less film speed

  2. #12
    wildbill's Avatar
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    adorama's got free shipping right now on formulary metol http://www.adorama.com/searchsite/de...archinfo=metol
    www.vinnywalsh.com

    I know what I want but I just don't know how to go about gettin' it.-Hendrix

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by norm123 View Post
    Hi

    I read a lot of good things about this develloper but I don't know where to buy it. I was thinking that it was obsolete since a lot of time.

    Are there some equivalent?

    Thank you
    Lots of good tips already. It's super easy to mix having only two ingredients... I'm using it exclusively now. After mixing it try using it straight and diluted 1+1 and 1+3 with water, see what flavor you like best.

    P.S. I have made it using a scale as well as the teaspoon / tablespoon formula BradS mentioned and did not see a difference in my negatives / prints.

  4. #14
    baachitraka's Avatar
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    Never tried D-23 personally, but I am very happy with Barry Thornton Two Bath for ISO 400 films.
    OM-1n: Do I need to own a Leica?
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    Agfa Isolette III: Amazingly simple, yet it produces outstanding negatives.
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  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael R 1974 View Post
    Xmas:

    1) D-23 is not a low contrast developer and is not like POTA at all

    2) D-23 was formulated by Henn to essentially be a substitute for D-76. The working characteristics are very close. D-23 is said to give slightly finer grain with slightly less film speed
    As I understand, D-23 was a Kodak commercial offering. So why did Kodak discontinue D-23 and keep D-76 and HC-110? That's not a challenge to your comment, but a question. I.E. why should I buy D-76 when I can mix D-23 so easily?
    "Far more critical than what we know or do not know is what we do not want to know." - Eric Hoffer

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael R 1974 View Post
    Xmas:

    1) D-23 is not a low contrast developer and is not like POTA at all

    2) D-23 was formulated by Henn to essentially be a substitute for D-76. The working characteristics are very close. D-23 is said to give slightly finer grain with slightly less film speed
    POTA is more extreme than D23 eg for extracting spectrography lines out of starlight... but the massive dev chart has D23 as a low contrast dev...
    and

    Anchell ' says'
    "... it would seem that the best developers to use are those that exhibit superadditive characteristics. Most general-purpose developers fall into this category. However, there is a flip side. Most developers that utilize this effect tend to yield greater high-value density than those that rely on one developing agent. A developer of the semi-compensating type using either metol or pyro alone in a solution of relatively low pH, is capable of producing brilliant high values, full-scale mid-tones and shadows (e.g. Kodak D-23 and Kodak D-1, ABC Pyro, especially Edward Weston's variation)." - pp 42

    "Kodak D-23 This is a semi-compensating developer that produces fine shadow values while retaining a high emulsion speed... Note: This developer produces negatives of speed and graininess comparable to Kodak D-76, without D-76's tendency to block highlights. " - pp. 150

    Have you tried D23?

    Noel

  7. #17
    BradS's Avatar
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    D23 maybe thought of as "semi-compensating"...but it is really not correct to call it low contrast. It is or can be very similar to D76 in use and produces similar results.

  8. #18
    Shawn Dougherty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BradS View Post
    D23 maybe thought of as "semi-compensating"...but it is really not correct to call it low contrast. It is or can be very similar to D76 in use and produces similar results.
    I agree, it is definitely capable of N+ development even diluted 1+3 and I find the local contrast to be exceptional.

  9. #19

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    Yes I have tested D-23. But you don't have to trust me. Read about it in Haist etc.

    If you're going to quote Anchell you forgot the parts in FDC where they say D-23 will be found to work nearly identically to D-76, and also the part where they say D-76 is functionally a single agent developer. Etc.

    In any case the quotes you listed are severe oversimplifications of the mechanisms of superadditivity. Having a single developing agent says nothing about film speed, contrast etc. What about concentration? D-76 is not D-23 + a second developing agent. It has a much lower Metol concentration than D-23.

    The point is there are many variables, and it therefore makes no sense to generalize about developers based simply on how many developing agents they have in them. It just doesn't work that way.

    The notion D-23 is a "semi-compensating" (whatever that even means) or low contrast developer is simply another one of those photographic myths.

    As for POTA, it is entirely different and produces very different results. It isn't a general purpose formula.


    Quote Originally Posted by Xmas View Post
    POTA is more extreme than D23 eg for extracting spectrography lines out of starlight... but the massive dev chart has D23 as a low contrast dev...
    and

    Anchell ' says'
    "... it would seem that the best developers to use are those that exhibit superadditive characteristics. Most general-purpose developers fall into this category. However, there is a flip side. Most developers that utilize this effect tend to yield greater high-value density than those that rely on one developing agent. A developer of the semi-compensating type using either metol or pyro alone in a solution of relatively low pH, is capable of producing brilliant high values, full-scale mid-tones and shadows (e.g. Kodak D-23 and Kodak D-1, ABC Pyro, especially Edward Weston's variation)." - pp 42

    "Kodak D-23 This is a semi-compensating developer that produces fine shadow values while retaining a high emulsion speed... Note: This developer produces negatives of speed and graininess comparable to Kodak D-76, without D-76's tendency to block highlights. " - pp. 150

    Have you tried D23?

    Noel

  10. #20

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    I have done business with the following company several times and have always been satisfied with the service and products.

    http://www.techcheminc.com/

    Kodak D-23 has never really gone out of favor. It is a general purpose developer producing clean negatives. It is best used for higher than normal contrast scenes or films like Ilford Pan F which tend to be contrasty by nature.

    By mixing your own you are privy to a whole range of developer formulas which can be very convenient and also save money. For example add borax to the two chemicals used in D-23 and you have D-76H.
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 01-23-2014 at 01:02 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

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